The Art of Hunger by Paul Auster
Essays, Prefaces, Interviews, The Red Notebook

No critic rating

Waiting for minimum critic reviews

See 2 Critic Reviews

unrated

Synopsis

Now including The Red Notebook--a collection of autobiographical sketches on coincidence--The Art Of Hunger undermines our accepted notions about literature. Auster's meditations on writing and artists leads us to a better understanding of the toll of writing.
 

About Paul Auster

See more books from this Author
Paul Auster was born on February 3, 1947, in Newark, New Jersey. He received a B.A. and a M.A. in English and Comparative Literature from Columbia University. In addition to his career as a writer, Auster has been a census taker, tutor, merchant seaman, little-league baseball coach, and a telephone operator. He started his writing career as a translator. He soon gained popularity for the detective novels that make up his New York Trilogy. His other works include The Invention of Solitude; Leviathan; Moon Palace; Facing the Music; In the Country of Last Things; The Music of Chance; Mr. Vertigo; and The Brooklyn Follies. His latest novels are entitled, Invisible and Sunset Park. In addition to his novels, Auster has written screenplays and directed several films. He is the recipient of a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts and a French Prix Medicis for Foreign Literature.
 
Published September 1, 1993 by Penguin Books. 352 pages
Genres: Education & Reference, Literature & Fiction. Non-fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for The Art of Hunger

Publishers Weekly

See more reviews from this publication

Auster's acclaimed novel City of Glass , a dreamlike meditation on language and fiction in the form of a detective novel, has been translated into comics form to stunning effect.

| Read Full Review of The Art of Hunger: Essays, Pr...

Publishers Weekly

See more reviews from this publication

The novelist supplies a literary autobiography in essays and interviews.

| Read Full Review of The Art of Hunger: Essays, Pr...

Rate this book!

Add Review