The Atomic Bazaar by William Langewiesche
The Rise of the Nuclear Poor

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Synopsis

In his shocking and revelatory new work, the celebrated journalist William Langewiesche investigates the burgeoning global threat of nuclear weapons production. This is the story of the inexorable drift of nuclear weapons technology from the hands of the rich into the hands of the poor. As more unstable and undeveloped nations find ways of acquiring the ultimate arms, the stakes of state-sponsored nuclear activity have soared to frightening heights. Even more disturbing is the likelihood of such weapons being manufactured and deployed by guerrilla non-state terrorists.

Langewiesche also recounts the recent history of Abdul Qadeer Khan, the scientist at the forefront of nuclear development and trade in the Middle East who masterminded the theft and sale of centrifuge designs that helped to build Pakistan's nuclear arsenal, and who single-handedly peddled nuclear plans to North Korea, Iran, and other potentially hostile countries. He then examines in dramatic and tangible detail the chances for nuclear terrorism.

From Hiroshima to the present day, Langewiesche describes a reality of urgent consequence to us all. This searing, provocative, and timely report is a triumph of investigative journalism, and a masterful laying out of the most critical political problem the world now faces.

 

About William Langewiesche

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William Langewiesche is an American author and journalist, and was a professional airplane pilot for many years. He is currently the international correspondent for the magazine Vanity Fair, but made his name as a national correspondent for The Atlantic Monthly magazine. He has written articles covering events such as the World Trade Center cleanup, a three-part series which was published as the book American Ground. Langewiesche was a finalist for the 2004 Lettre Ulysses Award for the Art of Reportage for American Ground. Unbuilding the World Trade Center and 2005 for The Outlaw Sea. He was a finalist for the 2007 Michael Kelly Award. He currently lives in France.
 
Published July 17, 2003 by Farrar, Straus and Giroux. 192 pages
Genres: History, Political & Social Sciences, Travel, War, Professional & Technical. Non-fiction

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Kirkus Reviews

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His country became a nuclear power through his efforts, but Khan’s willingness to deal with the likes of North Korea and Iran made him a handy scapegoat when Pakistan needed to placate an angry United States.

May 01 2007 | Read Full Review of The Atomic Bazaar: The Rise o...

The New York Times

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“Though it would be politically inconvenient to admit this now,” Mr. Langewiesche writes of events in 1991, “the United States was aware not only of Khan’s peddling of nuclear wares to Iran, but also of the likely involvement of the army and government of Pakistan.” And the United States’ onetime...

May 17 2007 | Read Full Review of The Atomic Bazaar: The Rise o...

The New York Times

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Langewiesche counts the total killed in the two attacks (around 220,000), then delivers his own one-sentence bomb: “The intent was to terrorize a nation to the maximum extent, and there is nothing like nuking civilians to achieve that effect.” Skip to next paragraph THE ATOMIC BAZAAR...

May 20 2007 | Read Full Review of The Atomic Bazaar: The Rise o...

The Guardian

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(They may have long...#8209;range missiles, but it's by no means clear that countries such as Iran or North Korea will develop viable nuclear warheads for them.) But if Langewiesche is right in saying that determined states can't be prevented from getting nuclear weapons - and the contrasting exp...

Jul 14 2007 | Read Full Review of The Atomic Bazaar: The Rise o...

Entertainment Weekly

In The Atomic Bazaar, a series of articles originally penned for The Atlantic Monthly, William Langewiesche examines the problems of proliferation in a nuclear world, and the way that fear of retaliation between superpowers has left the most dangerous weapons in the hands of the poorest nations.

May 25 2007 | Read Full Review of The Atomic Bazaar: The Rise o...

The Millions

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Bookmarks Magazine

The end of the Cold War heralded the end of the superpowers’ monopoly on nuclear arms, and recent technological advances have made them more affordable for Third World countries aspiring to join the "Nuclear Club."

Aug 07 2007 | Read Full Review of The Atomic Bazaar: The Rise o...

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