The Black Album by Hanif Kureishi

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Synopsis

Stuck in a lackluster community college after a less-than-ideal high-school career, music-loving Shadid Hasan strives to impress two incompatible camps in his conservative Muslim neighbors and radical lecturer Deedee Osgood. 30,000 first printing. Tour.
 

About Hanif Kureishi

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Hanif Kureishi won England's prestigious Whitbread Prize for his first novel, The Buddha of Suburbia. His screenplays include Sammy and Rosie Get Laid and My Beautiful Laundrette, which received an Oscar nomination for Best Screenplay. His other works include the novels The Black Album and Gabriel's Gift and the short story collection Love in a Blue Time. He lives in London.
 
Published January 1, 1995 by Faber and Faber. 288 pages
Genres: Literature & Fiction, Mystery, Thriller & Suspense, Action & Adventure, Horror, Crime. Fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for The Black Album

Kirkus Reviews

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The novel's loose construction leads it to a predictably open-ended conclusion, but that seems perfectly appropriate for a coming-of-age tale whose unformed hero can't decide from one moment to the next whether he's to become a dutiful son and brother, a great novelist, or the happily exhausted b...

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The Guardian

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Its fragments from a politically-committed life under assault - from goatish ex-husband, druggy son, floundering dad and boozy mum - don't exactly come together, until they too perfectly come together: the idealistic heroine is hospitalised because her heart is too big for her body.

Jul 26 2009 | Read Full Review of The Black Album

The Guardian

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Jonathan Bonnici has the right uncertainty as the confused Shahid and there is staunch support from Robert Mountford as his Thatcherite brother, Shereen Martineau as his glamorous sister-in-law, Tanya Franks as the randy lecturer and Alexander Andreou as the adamantine Riaz.

Jul 22 2009 | Read Full Review of The Black Album

Publishers Weekly

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Again cleverly mining the chaos and contradictions of multicultural, postmodern England, Kureishi (The Buddha of Suburbia) follows the turbulent social and spiritual education of an impressionable young Pakistani at an inferior London college, where he struggles with conflicting personal, familia...

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Publishers Weekly

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Oscar-nominated screenwriter Kureishi's second novel is a multicultural coming-of-age tale.

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The Telegraph

Hanif Kureishi’s new dramatisation of his 1995 novel is about a subject that matters - the rise of radical Islam in the UK.

Jul 22 2009 | Read Full Review of The Black Album

London Review of Books

The local bands have little access to records from abroad, and no means of production or distribution of their music other than rudimentary tapes recorded on eight-track machines at gigs and passed on through friends.

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The Jewish Chronicle

As Richard Bean’s England People Very Nice — with its hilarious ethnic stereotypes of oy veying Chasids, agricultural Irish, bone-headed English and militant Islamists — nears the end of its run, up pops Hanif Kureishi’s adaptation of his 1993 novel.

Jul 23 2009 | Read Full Review of The Black Album

Variety

He finds himself torn between Muslim extremism, via a group of students led by charismatic Riaz (Alexander Andreou), and Western liberal hedonism, embodied by lecturer Deedee Osgood (Tanya Franks), with whom Shahid embarks on an affair.

Jul 23 2009 | Read Full Review of The Black Album

Reader Rating for The Black Album
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