The Blood Countess by Andrei Codrescu

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Synopsis

A portrait of Hungarian countess Elizabeth Bathory follows her real-life sixteenth-century reign of torture and murder.
 

About Andrei Codrescu

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Romanian-born poet and essayist Andrei Codrescu, who also utilizes the pen names Betty Laredo and Maria Parfeni, emigrated to the United States in 1966. Codrescu earned a B.A. at the University of Bucharest, and has taught at numerous academic institutions including Johns Hopkins, the University of Baltimore, and Louisiana State University. Codrescu worked for National Public Radio as a commentator and has been featured on ABC News' Nightline. Some of Codrescu's short stories and novels include his first poetry collection, License to Carry a Gun and a memoir entitled In America's Shoe. Throughout the years, Codrescu has been awarded many honors including the Big Table Poetry Award, General Electric Foundation Poetry Prize, and National Endowment for the Arts Fellowships for poetry, editing, and radio. His titles include The Posthuman Dada Guide: Tzara and Lenin Play Chess, The Poetry Lesson, and Whatever Gets You through the Night: A Story of Sheherezade and the Arabian Entertainments.
 
Published August 1, 1995 by Simon & Schuster. 347 pages
Genres: Horror, Literature & Fiction, History. Fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for The Blood Countess

Kirkus Reviews

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Romanian-born poet, essayist, and NPR commentator Codrescu (Road Scholar, 1993, etc.) abandoned plans for a factual book about Elizabeth Bathory, his real-life ancestor, a beautiful Hungarian countess convicted and imprisoned for torturing and murdering more than 600 young girls--and has instead ...

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Publishers Weekly

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Finally, Elizabeth becomes pure literary symbol, a ghostly figure ``from whose ashes has risen the modern world and all its horrors.'' That is an enormous burden for any character to bear, and Codrescu is less persuasive in connecting his journalist's interpretations to his fable-like reconstruct...

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Publishers Weekly

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NPR commentator and filmmaker Codrescu's first novel alternates between a pathological 16th-century Hungarian countess and her present-day descendant, a journalist seeking to come to grips with contemporary Europe.

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Entertainment Weekly

A Dracula-esque tale based on Hungarian countess Elizabeth Bathory (1560- 1613), possibly the most sadistic murderess in history (she liked to bathe in blood).

Jul 26 1996 | Read Full Review of The Blood Countess

Entertainment Weekly

The Hungarian countess Elizabeth Bathory (1560-1613) was powerful, beautiful, intelligent, and possibly the most sadistic murderess in all of history.

Sep 08 1995 | Read Full Review of The Blood Countess

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