The Book of Hrabal by Peter Esterhazy

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Winner of the 2004 German Publishers and Booksellers Association Peace Prize
Named a New York Times Notable Book of 1994
Winner of 1995 The New York Times Review Notable Books

An elaborate, elegant homage to the great Czech storyteller Bohumil Hrabal (author of Closely Watched Trains), The Book of Hrabal is also a farewell to the years of communism in Eastern Europe and a glowing paean to the mixed blessings of domestic life.

Anna, blues-singing housewife and mother of three, addresses her reminiscences and reflections to Hrabal. They swing from domestic matters, to accounts of the injustices suffered by her family during the Stalinist 1950s and the police harassment in subsequent years, to her husband's crazy ideas. He frets over his current project, a book celebrating Hrabal, but seems unable to write it. Meanwhile, two angels, undercover as secret policemen, shadow the household-communicating via walkie-talkie-to prevent Anna from aborting her fourth child. God himself (aka Bruno) enters the scene; he chats with Hrabal, takes saxophone lessons from an irreverent Charlie Parker (unfortunately even this doesn't cure his tone-deaf ear), and tries to play the saxophone to dissuade her from ending the pregnancy.
 

About Peter Esterhazy

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Esterhazy is a prolific essayist and a playwright. Judith is a Senior Editor at Cornina Books in Budapest
 
Published January 1, 1993 by Quartet Books. 176 pages
Genres: Literature & Fiction, Law & Philosophy, Romance. Fiction

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Even God, musically inept despite saxophone lessons from the late Charlie Parker, in desperation picks up Parker's sax to prevent Anna from having the abortion: ``He bit the mouthpiece and blew into the tube, he knew right away it was no good, like blowing his nose, hopelessly bad, not a little o...

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Publishers Weekly

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Politics may make strange bedfellows, but those pairings pale beside the cast assembled here by Hungarian author Esterhazy. The odd roster includes a Hungarian writer (a nameless scribe who was ``supp

Nov 07 1994 | Read Full Review of The Book of Hrabal

Publishers Weekly

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Politics may make strange bedfellows, but those pairings pale beside the cast assembled here by Hungarian author Esterhazy.

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