The Boy Who Stole the Leopard's Spots by Tamar Myers

No critic rating

Waiting for minimum critic reviews

See 5 Critic Reviews

This third in the series...is not a mystery in the traditional sense. But it provides a fascinating look at life in a colonial Africa on the brink of catastrophic change as the wily Cripple manipulates her self-anointed betters.
-Kirkus

Synopsis

Like Alexander McCall Smith’s ever-popular No. 1 Ladies’ Detective Agency novels, The Boy Who Stole the Leopard’s Spots immerses readers in a breathtaking African landscape they simply will not wish to leave. For the third time, author Tamar Myers carries readers a world away from Charleston, South Carolina, and her Den of Antiquity cozy mysteries—circling the globe to the Belgian Congo in equatorial Africa in the 1950s.  The Boy Who Stole the Leopard’s Spots is a wonderfully engrossing, breathtakingly evocative return to the lush locale of her previous acclaimed African-set mysteries, The Witchdoctor’s Wife (“[A] mesmerizing novel….Authentic. Powerful. Triumphant” —Carolyn Hart) and The Headhunter’s Daughter—as a monsignor of the Catholic church, shamed by a secret event in his past and accused of a terrible crime, must join forces with an American missionary, a police chief, and a witchdoctor and his wise-woman wife to clear his name.
 

About Tamar Myers

See more books from this Author
Tamar Myers is the author of the "Den of Antiquity" series as well as the Pennsylvania-Dutch mysteries for Bantam. Born and raised in the Congo, she lives in North Carolina.
 
Published May 8, 2012 by William Morrow Paperbacks. 304 pages
Genres: Mystery, Thriller & Suspense, History, Literature & Fiction. Fiction
Add Critic Review

Critic reviews for The Boy Who Stole the Leopard's Spots
All: 5 | Positive: 5 | Negative: 0

Kirkus

Excellent
Reviewed by Kirkus Reviews on May 01 2012

This third in the series...is not a mystery in the traditional sense. But it provides a fascinating look at life in a colonial Africa on the brink of catastrophic change as the wily Cripple manipulates her self-anointed betters.

Read Full Review of The Boy Who Stole the Leopard... | See more reviews from Kirkus

Examiner

Excellent
Reviewed by Zack Kopp on Jun 15 2012

This third in the series based on Myers’s life as the child of missionaries in the Belgian Congo is not a mystery in the traditional sense, but it provides a fascinating look at life in colonial Africa...

Read Full Review of The Boy Who Stole the Leopard...

Book Reporter

Excellent
Reviewed by Donna Volkenannt on May 25 2012

THE BOY WHO STOLE THE LEOPARD’S SPOTS should appeal to readers who enjoy historical fiction with touches of romance and suspense.

Read Full Review of The Boy Who Stole the Leopard...

Luxury Reading

Good
Reviewed by Jessa Larsen on Jun 24 2012

Based upon a time in history in which there was much conflict between Europeans and Africans...Myers’ personal experience definitely shone through and I was very impressed by her storytelling.

Read Full Review of The Boy Who Stole the Leopard...

Auntiemwrites's Weblog

Good
Reviewed by Marni Graff on May 27 2012

This is a highly unorthodox novel that paints a vivid picture of a society far removed...The lush, tropical feel of the place is reverberates off the page; the characters are drawn with wit and a heavy dose of acumen relating to human nature.

Read Full Review of The Boy Who Stole the Leopard...

Reader Rating for The Boy Who Stole the Leopard's Spots
55%

An aggregated and normalized score based on 14 user ratings from iDreamBooks & iTunes


Rate this book!

Add Review
×