The Boy with the Perpetual Nervousness by

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Caveney seeks to understand pain and find redemption through the very act of surviving. Raw, compelling, and darkly lyrical.
-Kirkus

Synopsis

An enthralling, emotional memoir that recounts the ups and downs of coming-of-age, set against the music and literature of the 1970s.

Raised in a small town in the north of England known primarily for its cotton mills, football team, and its deep roots in the “Respectable Working Class,” Graham Caveney armed himself against the confusing nature of adolescence with a thick accent, a copy of Kafka, and a record collection including the likes of the Buzzcocks and Joy Division. All three provided him the opportunity to escape, even if just in mind, beyond his small-town borders. But, when those passions are noticed and preyed upon by a mentor, everything changes.

Now, as an adult, Caveney attempts to reconcile his past and present, coming to grips with both the challenges and wonder of adolescence, music, and literature. By turns angry, despairing, beautifully written, shockingly funny, and ultimately redemptive, The Boy with Perpetual Nervousness is a tribute to the power of the arts—and a startling, original memoir that “feels as if it had to be written, and demands to be read” (The Guardian UK).
 

About the Author

 
Published July 3, 2018 by Simon & Schuster. 272 pages
Genres: Biographies & Memoirs, Parenting & Relationships, Political & Social Sciences. Non-fiction
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Critic reviews for The Boy with the Perpetual Nervousness
All: 3 | Positive: 3 | Negative: 0

Kirkus

Good
on Apr 30 2018

Caveney seeks to understand pain and find redemption through the very act of surviving. Raw, compelling, and darkly lyrical.

Read Full Review of The Boy with the Perpetual Ne... | See more reviews from Kirkus

Guardian

Above average
Reviewed by Joe Moran on Sep 13 2017

This book is not flawless – its tone can sometimes be uneven and its namechecking of other authors and cultural theorists a distraction. But it feels as if it had to be written, and it demands to be read.

Read Full Review of The Boy with the Perpetual Ne... | See more reviews from Guardian

Guardian

Good
Reviewed by Peter Stanford on Aug 07 2017

The Boy With the Perpetual Nervousness recounts with great courage and candour how, in the 1970s, as the clever, awkward, nerdy, only child of devoutly Catholic working-class parents in Accrington, Lancashire, he was groomed by a priest at his local grammar school in Blackburn, and then sexually abused by him.

Read Full Review of The Boy with the Perpetual Ne... | See more reviews from Guardian

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