The Bus Driver Who Wanted to Be God & Other Stories by Etgar Keret

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Synopsis

Israel's hippest bestselling young writer today, Etgar Keret is part court jester, part literary crown prince, part national conscience. The Bus Driver Who Wanted to Be God gathers his daring and provocative short stories for the first time in English.

Brief, intense, painfully funny, and shockingly honest, Keret's stories are snapshots that illuminate with intelligence and wit the hidden truths of life. As with the best comic authors, hilarity and anguish are the twin pillars of his work. Keret covers a remarkable emotional and narrative terrain-from a father's first lesson to his boy to a standoff between soldiers caught in the Middle East conflict to a slice of life where nothing much happens.

Bus Driver includes stories from Keret's bestselling collections in Israel, Pipelines and Missing Kissinger, as well as Keret's major new novella, "Kneller's Happy Campers," a bitingly satirical yet wistful road trip set in the afterlife for suicides.
 

About Etgar Keret

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Born in Tel Aviv in 1967, Etgar Keret is one of the leading voices in Israeli literature and cinema. In the last ten years he has published three books of short stories and novellas, two comics books, two feature screenplays, and numerous teleplays. Bestsellers in Israel, his story collections have been published in eight different languages. His movie, "Malka Red-Heart," won the Israeli "Oscar," as well as acclaim at several international film festivals. Keret lectures at Tel Aviv University's School of Film.
 
Published October 12, 2001 by Thomas Dunne Books. 176 pages
Genres: Education & Reference, Literature & Fiction, Religion & Spirituality, Humor & Entertainment. Fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for The Bus Driver Who Wanted to Be God & Other Stories

Kirkus Reviews

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Even the novella, “Kneller's Happy Campers,” the only substantial work here as well as the only new one, is fairly threadbare: a first-person tale of the special afterlife reserved for suicides, said afterlife bearing a depressing resemblance to the hellish real-life world of suburbia.

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The Guardian

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The Nimrod Flip Out by Etgar Keret, translated by Miriam Shlesinger and Sondra Silverston (224pp, Chatto, £10.99) The Bus Driver Who Wanted To Be God by Etgar Keret, translated by Miriam Shlesinger et al (200pp, Toby Press, £7.99) The world is at the end of its tether, obviously, and nowhere more...

Mar 26 2005 | Read Full Review of The Bus Driver Who Wanted to ...

Publishers Weekly

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Keret attempts to render often sad or tragic events with a light touch, and his plots lend a fantastical, whimsical air to simple, everyday reality: a bus driver is obsessed with keeping his schedule, a stewardess falls in love with a passenger, a man is befriended by an angel in disguise, a woma...

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Book Reporter

Etgar Keret, young hot shot author from Israel, has a razor-sharp voice barbed with sarcastic wit, surprising turns of phrase, and a style reminiscent of David Foster Wallace's BRIEF INTERVIEWS WITH HIDEOUS MEN.

Jan 21 2011 | Read Full Review of The Bus Driver Who Wanted to ...

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