The Call of the Weird by Louis Theroux
Travels in American Subcultures

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It is certainly a more reflective and responsible Louis Theroux who emerges out of the pages of this oddly penitential book. One can't help but wonder where the new, morally improved Louis will go next.
-Guardian

Synopsis

No, it doesn’t get any weirder than this: Thor Templar, Lord Commander of the Earth Protectorate, who claims to have killed ten aliens. Or April, the Neo-Nazi bringing up her twin daughters Lamb and Lynx (A.K.A. Prussian Blue, a white-power folk group for kids) and her youngest daughter, Dresden. For a decade, Louis Theroux has been making acclaimed television programs about offbeat characters on the fringes of U.S. society. Now he revisits the people who have intrigued him the most to try to discover what motivates them-and why they hold their bizarre beliefs. Reflecting on these assorted dreamers, schemers, and outlaws, Theroux entertainingly and unforgettably creates “a moving, funny, and frightening exposé of America and its often elusive dream” (NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC).
 

About Louis Theroux

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Louis Therouxhas written forSpy, worked on Michael Moore’s Emmy-winningTV Nation, and hosted his own award-winning television seriesWeird WeekendsandWhen Louis Met....This is his first book He lives in London.
 
Published September 4, 2008 by Pan. 306 pages
Genres: Political & Social Sciences, Education & Reference, Travel, Action & Adventure, Humor & Entertainment, Literature & Fiction, Arts & Photography. Non-fiction
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Critic reviews for The Call of the Weird
All: 2 | Positive: 1 | Negative: 1

Guardian

Above average
Reviewed by Sean O'Hagan on Nov 19 2005

It is certainly a more reflective and responsible Louis Theroux who emerges out of the pages of this oddly penitential book. One can't help but wonder where the new, morally improved Louis will go next.

Read Full Review of The Call of the Weird: Travel... | See more reviews from Guardian

Guardian

Above average
Reviewed by Sean O'Hagan on Nov 19 2005

The most surprising thing about this odd book, then, is not the extremity of its subjects' voices, but the compassion of his, which has switched tone from irony to something approaching outright sympathy, even, in places, identification.

Read Full Review of The Call of the Weird: Travel... | See more reviews from Guardian

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