The Call of the Wild by Jack; Introduction By Avi London

78%

10 Critic Reviews

If you can get through the sections of abuse, I do recommend this classic adventure tale. It's a quick read, it left me thinking, and it would be perfect to read as a winter storm blows outside.
-The Introverted Reader

Synopsis

Jack London's novels and ruggedly individual life seemed to embody American hopes, frustrations, and romantic longings in the turbulent first years of the twentieth century, years infused with the wonder and excitement of great technological and historic change. The author's restless spirit, taste for a life of excitement, and probing mind led him on a series of hard-edged adventures from the Klondike to the South Seas. Out of these sometimes harrowing experiences — and his fascination with the theories of such thinkers as Darwin, Spencer, and Marx — came the inspiration for novels of adventure that would make him one of America’s most popular writers.
The Call of the Wild, considered by many London's greatest novel, is a gripping tale of a heroic dog that, thrust into the brutal life of the Alaska Gold Rush, ultimately faces a choice between living in man’s world and returning to nature. Adventure and dog-story enthusiasts as well as students and devotees of American literature will find this classic work a thrilling, memorable reading experience. This edition features large, easy-to-read print.

 

About Jack; Introduction By Avi London

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One of the pioneers of 20th century American literature, Jack London specialized in tales of adventure inspired by his own experiences. London was born in San Francisco in 1876. At 14, he quit school and became an "oyster pirate," robbing oyster beds to sell his booty to the bars and restaurants in Oakland. Later, he turned on his pirate associates and joined the local Fish Patrol, resulting in some hair-raising waterfront battles. Other youthful activities included sailing on a seal-hunting ship, traveling the United States as a railroad tramp, a jail term for vagrancy and a hazardous winter in the Klondike during the 1897 gold rush. Those experiences converted him to socialism, as he educated himself through prolific reading and began to write fiction. After a struggling apprenticeship, London hit literary paydirt by combining memories of his adventures with Darwinian and Spencerian evolutionary theory, the Nietzchean concept of the "superman" and a Kipling-influenced narrative style. "The Son of the Wolf"(1900) was his first popular success, followed by 'The Call of the Wild" (1903), "The Sea-Wolf" (1904) and "White Fang" (1906). He also wrote nonfiction, including reportage of the Russo-Japanese War and Mexican revolution, as well as "The Cruise of the Snark" (1911), an account of an eventful South Pacific sea voyage with his wife, Charmian, and a rather motley crew. London's body broke down prematurely from his rugged lifestyle and hard drinking, and he died of uremic poisoning - possibly helped along by a morphine overdose - at his California ranch in 1916. Though his massive output is uneven, his best works - particularly "The Call of the Wild" and "White Fang" - have endured because of their rich subject matter and vigorous prose. Some pretty amazing things have happened to Avi. It all began in 1970, with "Things That Sometimes Happen, " his first book. His novels include two Newbery Honor Books, "Nothing but the Truth" and "The True Confessions of Charlotte Doyle, " also the winner of the "Boston Globe-Horn Book" Award. Avi's fifty books tell mysterious, fantastical, and historical tales, and even an animal tale or two, like "Poppy" (also a "Boston Globe-Horn Book" Award recipient) and "The Christmas Rat." He lives with his family in Denver, Colorado.
 
Published January 1, 2000 by SCHOLASTIC. 172 pages
Genres: Literature & Fiction. Non-fiction
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Critic reviews for The Call of the Wild
All: 10 | Positive: 9 | Negative: 1

The Bookbag

Good
Reviewed by Jill Murphy on Jan 01 1995

I hope this book will teach its readers to treat their animals right, to treat each other and everybody else right, and to continue to prove to me that a finely-crafted story, like The Call of the Wild, one told straight from the heart, is something to treasure for a lifetime.

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Book Review Circle

Good
Reviewed by Sayan Mukherjee on Apr 23 2015

One of my early classics...Now, when I reminisce about it I relate, with an adult mind, to the other themes in the book. I cannot help but wonder at the complexity of the layers, so deep yet so simply structured. A timeless tale for all and sundry.

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Parental Book Reviews

Good
on Apr 23 2015

I actually really liked this book. It reminded me of my childhood. As a kid, my favorite movie was Spirit: Stallion of the Cimarron, my favorite book was My Side of the Mountain, and I was obsessed with wilderness stories, like those by Gary Paulsen. The Call of the Wild especially reminded me of Spirit...

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Parental Book Reviews

Good
on Feb 22 2013

The book was very interesting. It showed the relationship between a men and a dog. The book had a lot of adventure and action especially when Buck was fighting with Spitz. The ending was sad and it wasn’t and obvious end. In overall, the book was good.

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The Introverted Reader

Good
Reviewed by Introverted Jen on Oct 06 2012

If you can get through the sections of abuse, I do recommend this classic adventure tale. It's a quick read, it left me thinking, and it would be perfect to read as a winter storm blows outside.

Read Full Review of The Call of the Wild

Prolific Living

Above average
on Apr 23 2015

The transformation of Buck from a house dog to a wild wolf-like leader of the pack in the harshest conditions known to man and animal is oh so captivating.

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Pages Unbound

Good
Reviewed by Krysta on Apr 12 2012

Though it does not have the amount of depth usually associated with those works that have gained the status of classics (the main theme is dormant primitive urges), it exudes a simple charm all its own.

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Your Move, Dickens

Excellent
Reviewed by Darlyn on Oct 27 2011

He soon succumbed to his instincts, and morphed into the kind of dog he should really be. Overall, I’m glad this book didn’t make me cry, but it was pretty UH-MAZING anyway.

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Prepping To Survive

Above average
on May 23 2012

I can see why the book is considered a classic. It’s a good book, well worth the read. However, for the empathetic, I will say that the book is replete with harsh and brutal scenes. So reader beware.

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Princess Reviews

Below average
Reviewed by Tasha Nicole on Dec 19 2011

The Call of the Wild is all about Buck and his changes. It is a classic. It's also a book of literary merit, and therefore is required to read in most English classes. Outside of English, I'm not sure I would have read this, but I'm glad I did.

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