The Cape and Other Stories from the Japanese Ghetto by Kenji Nakagami

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Synopsis

The fiction of Kenji Nakagami has no peer in contemporary Japan. Born into the burakumin -- an outcast class shunned in feudal Japan and still suffering discrimination today -- Nakagami depicts the lives of his people in powerful, sensual prose and stark, sometimes horrifying detail. The Cape is his breakthrough novella about a burakumin community in a small coastal city and their struggles with complicated family histories and troubled memories. Poverty, violence, suicide, and the harsh natural conditions of their home constantly disrupt their lives. Two more early stories, "The Burning House" and "Redhead, " continue these themes, relieved by small moments of profound tenderness.
 

About Kenji Nakagami

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Nakagami (1946-92) was a prolific novelist and short story writer who was admired as much for his prose style as his depictions of the burakumin. He received the prestigious Akutagawa Prize for "The Cape" in 1976.
 
Published September 1, 1999 by Stone Bridge Press. 192 pages
Genres: History, Education & Reference, Travel, Literature & Fiction. Fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for The Cape and Other Stories from the Japanese Ghetto

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A ceremony is held to honor Akiyuki's mother's first legal husband, while Akiyuki's biological father, ""that man,"" is reputed to recklessly haunt the red light district's prostitutes.

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Project MUSE

However, the sophistication of "House on Fire," a story that predates "The Cape," shows that Nakagami was in control of his narrative and knew what he was doing.

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