The Chicago Race Riots by Carl Sandburg
July, 1919

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Synopsis

Nearly a century ago, an African American teenager crossed an invisible line of segregation at a Chicago beach and paid with his life. The incident set off days of violence, resulting in dozens of deaths and hundreds of injuries. This contemporary account was written by Pulitzer Prize–winning author Carl Sandburg, who reported on the riots for the Chicago Daily News.
 

About Carl Sandburg

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Carl Sandburg was twice awarded the Pulitzer Prize, the first for History in 1940 for his six-volume biography of Abraham Lincoln, and the second for Poetry in 1951 for his Complete Poems. Born in Illinois of Swedish immigrant parents, Sandburg worked early in a wide variety of jobs, ranging from shoeshine-boy, milkman, fireman, and farmhand, to a soldier in the Spanish-American War. After college he went on to become a newspaperman, a political organizer, a collector of folk songs, author of children's books, lecturer, poet and historian. The son of a man who could not write his own name, Carl Sandburg went on to write over thirty books and earned the title in America of ?The Poet of the People.? Walter Lippmann (1889-1974) was the author of many books on political thought and was widely considered America's most distinguished syndicated columnist. In addition to being awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, he won two Pulitzer Prizes for his newspaper column "Today and Tomorrow," which appeared in the New YorkHerald Tribune.
 
Published January 16, 2013 by Dover Publications. 96 pages
Genres: Biographies & Memoirs, History, Literature & Fiction. Non-fiction

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