The Clockwork Universe by Edward Dolnick
Isaac Newton, the Royal Society, and the Birth of the Modern World

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Synopsis

New York Times bestselling author Edward Dolnick brings to light the true story of one of the most pivotal moments in modern intellectual history—when a group of strange, tormented geniuses invented science as we know it, and remade our understanding of the world. Dolnick’s earth-changing story of Isaac Newton, the Royal Society, and the birth of modern science is at once an entertaining romp through the annals of academic history, in the vein of Bill Bryson’s A Short History of Nearly Everything, and a captivating exploration of a defining time for scientific progress, in the tradition of Richard Holmes’ The Age of Wonder.
 

About Edward Dolnick

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Edward Dolnick is the author of Down the Great Unknown and the Edgar Award-winning The Rescue Artist. A former chief science writer at the Boston Globe, he has written for The Atlantic Monthly, the New York Times Magazine, and many other publications. He lives with his wife near Washington, D.C.
 
Published February 8, 2011 by HarperCollins e-books. 416 pages
Genres: History, Travel, Science & Math, Biographies & Memoirs. Non-fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for The Clockwork Universe

Kirkus Reviews

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Eventually, Edmund Halley persuaded Newton to publish his theories of gravity and its mathematical underpinnings, creating a paradigm of scientific work that would last for nearly 200 years.

Feb 08 2011 | Read Full Review of The Clockwork Universe: Isaac...

The New York Times

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Then Newton used his calculus to show how an apple is pulled to the earth and how the earth pulls the moon into an orbit, and how these pulls are the same as the sun’s on the planets.

Mar 25 2011 | Read Full Review of The Clockwork Universe: Isaac...

The Wall Street Journal

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The Royal Society's history of open-minded debate epitomizes science as a self-correcting process

Feb 26 2011 | Read Full Review of The Clockwork Universe: Isaac...

New York Journal of Books

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Mr. Dolnick presents the stories in a way that forces a modern audience sit up and take notice of the stories themselves.The Clockwork Universe reads much like a litany of classic stories of classic characters.

Feb 08 2011 | Read Full Review of The Clockwork Universe: Isaac...

The Economist

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New York City Ballet: Something old, something new.

Mar 10 2011 | Read Full Review of The Clockwork Universe: Isaac...

Denver Post

He diligently describes conditions at the time — life was nasty, brutish and short, to quote the 17th-century great Thomas Hobbes — to establish what a revolution in thought was underway.

Feb 10 2011 | Read Full Review of The Clockwork Universe: Isaac...

About.com

While members carried out many experiments that were changing the way scientists thought about the world the underlying thesis still held sway, that God created the world even to its most minute detail.

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David G. Schwartz

In THE CLOCKWORK UNIVERSE, Edward Dolnick gives the reader a sense of the world that the scientific greats of the early modern period inhabited, and lets us see that there was more than dry formulae to their lives.

Jan 30 2011 | Read Full Review of The Clockwork Universe: Isaac...

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