The Color of War by James Campbell
How One Battle Broke Japan and Another Changed America

93%

8 Critic Reviews

A fine account of a little-known milestone in the battle for civil rights.
-Kirkus

Synopsis

From the acclaimed World War II writer and author of The Ghost Mountain Boys, an incisive retelling of the key month, July 1944, that won the war in the pacific and ignited a whole new struggle on the home front. 

In the pantheon of great World War II conflicts, the battle for Saipan is often forgotten. Yet historian Donald Miller calls it "as important to victory over Japan as the Normandy invasion was to victory over Germany." For the Americans, defeating the Japanese came at a high price. In the words of a Time magazine correspondent, Saipan was "war at its grimmest." 

On the night of July 17, 1944, as Admirals Ernest King and Chester Nimitz were celebrating the battle's end, the Port Chicago Naval Ammunition Depot, just thirty-five miles northeast of San Francisco, exploded with a force nearly that of an atomic bomb. The men who died in the blast were predominantly black sailors. They toiled in obscurity loading munitions ships with ordnance essential to the US victory in Saipan. Yet instead of honoring the sacrifice these men made for their country, the Navy blamed them for the accident, and when the men refused to handle ammunition again, launched the largest mutiny trial in US naval history.

The Color of War is the story of two battles: the one overseas and the one on America's home turf. By weaving together these two narratives for the first time, Campbell paints a more accurate picture of the cataclysmic events that occurred in July 1944--the month that won the war and changed America.
 

About James Campbell

See more books from this Author
JAMES CAMPBELL is the author of The Final Frontiersman and The Ghost Mountain Boys. He has written for Outside magazine and many other publications.
 
Published May 15, 2012 by Crown. 514 pages
Genres: History, War, Travel, Political & Social Sciences. Non-fiction
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Critic reviews for The Color of War
All: 8 | Positive: 8 | Negative: 0

Kirkus

Excellent
Apr 01 2012

A fine account of a little-known milestone in the battle for civil rights.

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World War II Database

Excellent
Reviewed by C. Peter Chen on Jul 14 2012

Campbell's extended epilogue detailing the lives of the main cast of characters after the war and the evolution of the United States military in terms of racial integration was most fascinating and very much appreciated.

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Star News

Excellent
Reviewed by Ben Steelman on Jul 04 2012

Compulsively readable, Campbell’s account reminds us of where America’s true greatness lies: We keep striving to do better to become, for real, a more perfect Union.

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Florida Times-Union

Excellent
Reviewed by Lee Scott on Jul 22 2012

This well-researched, eminently readable volume shines a much-needed light on an underreported part of our military history and is a worthy addition to the World War II discipline.

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Copy Line Magazine

Excellent
May 29 2012

The Color of War juxtaposes the spirit of the Greatest Generation with the scars of segregation.

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A Bookish Affair

Good
Reviewed by Meg on May 18 2012

...the two stories are told through the people that were there. You get to know the people that were there and what they were seeing and feeling and where they were coming from.

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Feathered Quill Book Reviews

Good
May 07 2012

Now, at last James Campbell has written about some of the little guys who worked to save the country and never got any credit for it whatsoever.

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Battles and Books

Good
Reviewed by Patrick Shrier on Sep 14 2012

This is an excellent book that deserves to be on many historians bookshelves. It tells an important story of WWII in a sensitive and compelling manner.

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Reader Rating for The Color of War
90%

An aggregated and normalized score based on 8 user ratings from iDreamBooks & iTunes


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