The Daughters of Danaus by Mona Caird

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Synopsis

"What always bewilders me," Hadria says, bending over the balustrade among the ivy, "is the enormous gulf between what might be and what is, in human life."

In a bleak and solitary district of Scotland, a group of children form a secret society -- the Preposterous Society, they call it -- for the discussing of ideas.

Of them, Hadria seems especially to have absorbed the spirit of those mystic northern twilights. A slight, dark-haired girl, she has a pale, rather mysterious face, and large, bewitched-looking eyes -- yet she is full of life, and is an inspiration to her siblings . . . for her thoughts as much as for her actions.

Now a new thought disturbs her -- springing from a chance disagreement with a quotation from Emerson. In thinking of the greatness Emerson achieved, she wondered: could a woman do the same? Would circumstances allow a woman to raise herself to the same heights, in a society that expects it of a man?

The Daughters of Danaus is the moving story of a girl trying to find happiness in a world full of uncomfortable and even cruel realities.

 

About Mona Caird

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Romance author Jayne Ann Krentz was born in Borrego Springs, California on March 28, 1948. She received a B.A. in history from the University of California at Santa Cruz and a Masters degree in library science from San Jose State University. Before becoming a full-time author, she worked as a librarian. Her novels include: Truth or Dare, All Night Long, and Copper Beach. She has written under seven different names: Jayne Bentley, Amanda Glass, Stephanie James, Jayne Taylor, Jayne Castle, Amanda Quick and Jayne Ann Krentz. Her first book, Gentle Pirate, was published in 1980 under the name Jayne Castle. She currently uses only three personas to represent her three specialties. She uses the name Jayne Ann Krentz for her contemporary pieces, Amanda Quick for her historical fiction pieces, and Jayne Castle for her futuristic pieces. She has received numerous awards for her work including the 1995 Romantic Times Reviewer's Choice Award for Trust Me, the 2004 Romantic Times Reviewer's Choice Award for Falling Awake, the Romantic Times Career Achievement Award, the Romantic Times Jane Austen Award, and the Susan Koppelman Award for Feminist Studies for Dangerous Men and Adventurous Women: Romance Writers on the Appeal of the Romance.
 
Published May 16, 2012 by The Feminist Press at CUNY. 418 pages
Genres: Gay & Lesbian, Literature & Fiction, Romance, Education & Reference. Fiction

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