The Death of Alexander the Great by Paul Doherty
What-or Who-Really Killed the Young Conqueror of the Known World?

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In May 323 BC Alexander of Macedonia fell ill in Babylon. Within ten days he was dead. A military genius who raged through the Persian empire, Alexander believed he was the son of God, with a desire for everlasting glory and an urge to march and conquer the world. The Death of Alexander the Great critically analyzes this extraordinary conqueror who achieved so much before he died at the early age of 33. Alexander was a man who wanted to be a God, a Greek who wanted to be a Persian, a defender of liberties who spent most of his life taking away the liberties of others, and a king who could be compassionate to the lowliest yet ruthlessly wipe out an ancient city like Tyre and crucify 3,000 of its defenders. Doherty scrutinizes the circumstances surrounding Alexander’s death as he lay sweating beside a swimming pool in the summer palace of the Persian kings. Did Alexander die of alcoholism, a hideous bout of malaria, or were other factors involved? Alexander had been warned not to enter Babylon, so he surrounded himself with outstanding captains of war. This book is a dramatic reassessment of the leader’s mysterious final days.
 

About Paul Doherty

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P.C. Doherty is the author of several acclaimed mystery series including "The Sorrowful Mysteries of Brother Athelstan," the Hugh Corbett medieval mysteries, and the Canterbury Tales of mystery and murder. He lives in England.
 
Published August 31, 2004 by Carroll & Graf. 288 pages
Genres: Biographies & Memoirs, History, Political & Social Sciences, Travel. Non-fiction

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After providing an overview of Egyptian dynastic political history and the particular intramural intrigues besetting the House of Tut, Doherty provides a sensible though derivative conclusion: Tut died unexpectedly of a tumor, which may have had something to do with a hereditary disease.

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For all that, Isabella did chalk up some significant deeds, not least of which, writes English mystery author and historian Doherty (The Mysterious Death of Tutankhamun, 2002, etc.), was that “she brought about the first formal deposition of an English king, even though it was for her own selfish...

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The author deserts 14th-century England and Ancient Egypt (The Mask of Ra, 1999, etc.) to focus on the rivalry between Greece’s Alexander the Great and Persia’s King Darius in 334 b.c.

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Other sources suggest that Alexander fell ill after being repeatedly bitten by mosquitoes along the swampy Euphrates River, which has led some modern epidemiologists to posit that Alexander died of some ancestral West Nile virus.

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This tidy survey of the 14th-century reign of British king Edward II and his queen, Isabella, provides thumbnail sketches of a series of massacres, tortures, plots and counterplots leading to the mysterious circumstances surrounding the death of Edward, the first English king to be deposed from t...

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The House of Death) starts out by giving readers a detailed lesson on Alexander's life, and spends the latter half of the book examining whether or not it was the gods or royal competitors such his general Ptolemy or Macedonian co-regent Antipater who poisoned Alexander.

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