The Dilbert Future by Scott Adams
Thriving on Stupidity in the 21st Century

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Synopsis

In The Dilbert Future, Scott Adams turns futurist, offering a bold, compelling - and often hysterical - vision of future society. First, the good news: Human nature won't change much; many, if not most of us, will continue to be guided by the immutable principles of stupidity, selfishness, and horniness - much as we are today, but with more advanced technology. But there's more! Drawing on his keen grasp of human nature and social dynamics, Adams daringly predicts key developments in every part of the futurescape. For example, in The Dilbert Future, you'll learn in the future, life definitely won't be like Star Trek, there will be a huge market for technology products that help workers goof off and still get paid, Internet capacity will increase indefinitely to keep up with the egos of the people using it, and your clothes will be smarter than you. In The Dilbert Future, Scott Adams dons his soothsayer's robes and turns his piercing eye (and trenchant wit) to subjects as diverse as technology, the workplace, elections, the battle of the sexes, drive-through pet care, and the possibility of intelligent (or stupid) life on other planets. The Dilbert Future is a mind-boggling blend of farce and fact that plays our social hot buttons like a piano, leaving the reader gasping in both wonder and hilarity.
 

About Scott Adams

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Scott Adams, Cartoonist Scott Adams was born and raised in Windham, New York in the Catskill Mountains. He received a B.A. in economics from Hartwick College, Oneonta, NY and an MBA from the University of California, Berkeley. He is also a certified hypnotist. Adams worked in a bank for eight years and, while a bank teller, was robbed twice at gunpoint. He also worked for Pacific Bell for nine years and describes both jobs as "humiliating and low paying jobs." It was during this time, that Adams created the character Dilbert. He was entertaining himself during meetings by drawing insulting cartoons of his co-workers and bosses. In 1988, he mailed some sample comic strips featuring Dilbert to some major cartoon syndicates. He was offered a contract and Dilbert was launched in approximately fifty papers in 1989. Adams began working on Dilbert full time as well as speaking, writing, doing interviews, and designing artwork for licensed products. Dilbert is published in over 1,200 newspapers and has a hard cover business book called "The Dilbert Principle.
 
Published January 1, 1997 by Harperbusiness. 258 pages
Genres: Business & Economics, Comics & Graphic Novels, Humor & Entertainment. Non-fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for The Dilbert Future

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Countless people look forward to the morning paper because it contains a Dilbert comic strip, a fine way to start the day on a cheerful note. But recently, at least as evidenced by this book, Adams's

Jun 02 1997 | Read Full Review of The Dilbert Future: Thriving ...

Publishers Weekly

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Adams, creator of the Dilbert comic strip and author of The Dilbert Principle and other huge sellers, now shares his sentiments on the office colleague everyone loves to hate: the weasel.

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Publishers Weekly

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Among the 65 predictions here, Adams echoes many scholars in forecasting a work force of freelance experts doing contract work.

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