The Dragon Prince by Laurence Yep
A Chinese Beauty & the Beast Tale

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Synopsis

When a poor farmer falls into the clutches of a dragon, only Seven, his youngest daughter, will save him'by marrying the beast.
Publishers Weekly praised "Yep's elegant, carefully crafted storytelling" and Mak's "skillfully and radiantly rendered illustrations" in this captivating and luminous Chinese variation of the beauty and the beast tale.

A 1998 Notable Children's Trade Book in Social Studies (NCSS/CBC)
A 1997 Pick of the Lists (ABA)

 

About Laurence Yep

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Laurence Yep, born in 1948 in San Francisco, is a well-known writer of fiction for young adults. He has also written and edited several works for adults. Yep was educated at Marquette University and holds a Ph.D. from the State University of New York at Buffalo. Yep is Chinese American. He grew up in a black neighborhood in San Francisco, attended school in Chinatown, and later attended a predominately white high school. Much of the subject matter for his work comes out of his experiences trying to establish his own identity as a child and teenager. He writes about the experience of the "outsider" or "alien" and perhaps that is why his first writing was science fiction. Sweetwater, his first novel, was published in 1973 and is a work of science fiction. His second work Dragonwings published in 1975 is widely acclaimed. This is a work of historical fiction that deals with the Chinese American experience of the 1930's when many immigrants came to this country. Yep has gone on to write many other stories about Chinese Americans. He has also written mysteries, two of which have as the main character Mark Twain as a reporter in San Francisco. Yep has written fantasy works such as Shadow Lord and Kind Hearts and Gentle Monsters. Yep has won numerous awards for his work included a Book-of-the-Month-Club Writing Fellowship in 1970, the prestigious Newbery Medal Honor Book, and the Boston Globe-Horn Book Award several times. Kam Mak grew up in New York City's Chinatown. He earned his bachelor of fine arts degree from the School of Visual Arts, and since then he has illustrated book jackets for numerous publishers and taught painting at the Fashion Institute of Technology. He has also illustrated "The Moon of the Monarch Butterflie"s by Jean Craighead George, "The Year of the Panda" by Miriam Schlein, and "The Dragon Prince" by Laurence Yep. Ham Mak lives in Brooklyn, New York, with his wife and daughter.
 
Published September 30, 1997 by HarperCollins. 32 pages
Genres: Travel, Children's Books, Science Fiction & Fantasy, Political & Social Sciences, Literature & Fiction. Fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for The Dragon Prince

Kirkus Reviews

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The subtitle says all: A dragon ambushes a poor farmer and promises to eat the unfortunate man unless one of the farmer's seven daughters marries him.

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Publishers Weekly

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The nine-year-old narrator, who is modeled on Laurence Yep's (Dragonwings ) father, describes his shy reintroduction to his own father, a “Guest of the Golden Mountain” (someone who lives in America) who has returned to his family's village in China, this time to bring the narrator back to San Fr...

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Publishers Weekly

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This 1994 Newbery Honor Book, a prequel to Dragonwings, tells of 14-year-old Otter's 1865 emigration from China and subsequent travails in California.

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Publishers Weekly

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Monkey opens this narration--part of the saga of the dragons' efforts to reclaim their home--where the events of Dragon Cauldron left off: he and his companions are captives of the Boneless King and the traitorous dragon Pomfret.

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Publishers Weekly

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Touching his cheek, she says, ""I know the loom and stove and many ordinary things, but my hand has never touched wonder."" The dragon then dances, ""curling his powerful body as easily as a giant golden ribbon"" and spins until he becomes ""a column of light, and from the light stepped a handsom...

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Publishers Weekly

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""This Southern Chinese adaptation of a traditional Chinese tale gains notability through Yep's elegant, carefully crafted storytelling,"" said PW.

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Reader Rating for The Dragon Prince
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