The Dragonbone Chair by Tad Williams
(Memory, Sorrow, and Thorn, Book 1)

25%

6 Critic Reviews

Simon grows . . . As for the rest: derivative ideas, a numbing plot, banal invented languages, and no conclusion whatsoever. A vast, dusty, irrelevant drone.
-Kirkus

Synopsis

New York Times-bestselling Tad Williams’ landmark epic fantasy saga of Osten Ard begins an exciting new cycle!
 
“One of my favorite fantasy series.” —George R. R. Martin • “Groundbreaking.” —Patrick Rothfuss • “One of the great fantasy epics of all time.” —Christopher Paolini
 
With The Dragonbone Chair, Tad Williams introduced readers to the incredible fantasy world of Osten Ard. His beloved, internationally bestselling series Memory, Sorrow, and Thorn inspired a generation of modern fantasy writers, including George R.R. Martin, Patrick Rothfuss, and Christopher Paolini, and defined Tad Williams as one of the most important fantasy writers of our time.

This edition features a brand-new introduction from Tad Williams' editor as well as the original introduction from Williams himself! 

BOOK ONE: THE DRAGONBONE CHAIR
 
A war fueled by the powers of dark sorcery is about to engulf the peaceful land of Osten Ard—for Prester John, the High King, lies dying. And with his death, the Storm King, the undead ruler of the elf-like Sithi, seizes the chance to regain his lost realm through a pact with the newly ascended king. Knowing the consequences of this bargain, the king’s younger brother joins with a small, scattered group of scholars, the League of the Scroll, to confront the true danger threatening Osten Ard.
 
Simon, a kitchen boy from the royal castle unknowingly apprenticed to a member of this League, will be sent on a quest that offers the only hope of salvation, a deadly riddle concerning long-lost swords of power. Compelled by fate and perilous magics, he must leave the only home he’s ever known and face enemies more terrifying than Osten Ard has ever seen, even as the land itself begins to die.
 
After the landmark Memory, Sorrow, and Thorn trilogy, the epic saga of Osten Ard continues with the brand-new novel, The Heart of What Was Lost. Then don’t miss the upcoming trilogy, The Last King of Osten Ard, beginning with The Witchwood Crown!
 
Praise for Osten Ard:
 
“Inspired me to write my own seven-book trilogy.... It’s one of my favorite fantasy series.”
—George R. R. Martin, New York Times-bestselling author of The Game of Thrones
 
“Groundbreaking...changed how people thought of the genre, and paved the way for so much modern fantasy. Including mine.”
—Patrick Rothfuss, New York Times-bestselling author of The Name of the Wind
 
“Memory, Sorrow, and Thorn is one of the great fantasy epics of all time.”
—Christopher Paolini, New York Times-bestselling author of Eragon


From the Trade Paperback edition.
 

About Tad Williams

See more books from this Author
Tad Williams has held more jobs than any sane person should admit to—singing in a band, selling shoes, managing a financial institution, throwing newspapers, and designing military manuals, to name just a few. He also hosted a syndicated radio show for ten years, worked in theater and television production, taught both grade-school and college classes, and worked in multimedia for a major computer firm. He is cofounder of an interactive television company, and is currently writing comic books and film and television scripts as well. Tad and his family live in London and the San Francisco Bay Area.
 
Published March 1, 2005 by DAW. 668 pages
Genres: Science Fiction & Fantasy, Literature & Fiction, Children's Books, Horror. Fiction
Add Critic Review

Critic reviews for The Dragonbone Chair
All: 6 | Positive: 1 | Negative: 5

Kirkus

Below average
Reviewed by Kirkus Reviews on Oct 01 2008

Simon grows . . . As for the rest: derivative ideas, a numbing plot, banal invented languages, and no conclusion whatsoever. A vast, dusty, irrelevant drone.

Read Full Review of The Dragonbone Chair (Memory,... | See more reviews from Kirkus

Examiner

Above average
Reviewed by Brian Triplett on Apr 26 2011

"The Dragonbone Chair" has plot elements that might seem familiar to Martin fans, but the book is really a love letter to fantasy novels that were popular in the Seventies and Eighties.

Read Full Review of The Dragonbone Chair (Memory,...

The Bookbag

Below average
Reviewed by Hannah Crookes on May 01 2009

The first few hundred pages . . . were filled with unnecessary description and scene setting . . . I also felt completely and utterly lost at times in a sea of too many words.

Read Full Review of The Dragonbone Chair (Memory,...

SFFWorld.com

Above average
Reviewed by Bridie Roman on Sep 12 2009

Dark developments later in the book make for nail-biting stuff. My major problem with this book is that I couldn’t even begin to pronounce some of the names/words . . . and slow pace for the first hundred pages.

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Boomtron

Below average
Reviewed by Scott Andrews on Aug 01 2008

The first half of “The Dragonbone Chair” moves at a numbingly slow pace . . . Williams tells Simon’s rural wanderings in excruciating detail . . Williams’s prose reads awkwardly, particularly by modern standards . . The liegemen are interchangeable.

Read Full Review of The Dragonbone Chair (Memory,...

Helium

Below average
Reviewed by Kody Hackbusch on Mar 04 2010

Expect a few hundred pages before it gets interesting. There are exciting moments to be sure but the book as a whole drags.

Read Full Review of The Dragonbone Chair (Memory,...

Reader Rating for The Dragonbone Chair
79%

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