The Elusive Fox by Muhammad Zafzaf
(Middle East Literature In Translation)

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It feels as if something is lost in translation here. Capturing the cadences, and nuances of the cross-language exchanges in Essaouira at this time could have brought the story to life.
-NY Journal of Books

Synopsis

Considered one of Morocco’s most important contemporary writers, Muhammad Zafzaf created stories of alterity, compassionate tales inhabited by prostitutes, thieves, and addicts living in the margins of society. In The Elusive Fox, Zafzaf’s first novel to be translated into English, a young teacher visits the coastal city of Essaouira in the 1960s. There he meets a group of European bohemians and local Moroccans and is exposed to the grittier side of society.

More than a novel, The Elusive Fox is a portrait of a city during a time of fluid
cultural and political mores in Morocco.
 

About Muhammad Zafzaf

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Muhammad Zafzaf (1945-2001) was one of the most prominent writers of the Maghreb. The author of dozens of novels and short stories, Zafzaf was celebrated for his innovative, modernist, and aesthetic literature rooted in the detailed daily anxieties of the ordinary Moroccan. Mbarek Sryfi is a lecturer at the University of Pennsylvania. His translations have appeared in CELAAN, Metamorphoses, World Literature Today, and Banipal. Roger Allen is the Sascha Jane Patterson Harvie Professor Emeritus of Social Thought and Comparative Ethics, School of Arts and Sciences, and professor emeritus of Arabic and comparative literature at the University of Pennsylvania.
 
Published August 23, 2016 by Syracuse University Press. 120 pages
Genres: Literature & Fiction. Fiction
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NY Journal of Books

Below average
Reviewed by Barbara Roether on Aug 14 2016

It feels as if something is lost in translation here. Capturing the cadences, and nuances of the cross-language exchanges in Essaouira at this time could have brought the story to life.

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