The Enchantress of Florence by Salman Rushdie
A Novel

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Synopsis

A tall, yellow-haired, young European traveler calling himself “Mogor dell’Amore,” the Mughal of Love, arrives at the court of the Emperor Akbar, lord of the great Mughal empire, with a tale to tell that begins to obsess the imperial capital, a tale about a mysterious woman, a great beauty believed to possess powers of enchantment and sorcery, and her impossible journey to the far-off city of Florence.

The Enchantress of Florence
is the story of a woman attempting to command her own destiny in a man’s world. It is the story of two cities, unknown to each other, at the height of their powers–the hedonistic Mughal capital, in which the brilliant Akbar the Great wrestles daily with questions of belief, desire, and the treachery of his sons, and the equally sensual city of Florence during the High Renaissance, where Niccolò Machiavelli takes a starring role as he learns, the hard way, about the true brutality of power.

Vivid, gripping, irreverent, bawdy, profoundly moving, and completely absorbing, The Enchantress of Florence is a dazzling book full of wonders by one of the world’s most important living writers.


From the Hardcover edition.
 

About Salman Rushdie

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Salman Rushdie is the author of nine previous novels: Grimus; Midnight's Children (which was awarded the Booker Prize in 1981 and, in 1993, was judged to be the "Booker of Bookers," the best novel to have won that prize in its first twenty-five years); Shame (winner of the French Prix de Meilleur Livre Etranger); The Satanic Verses (winner of the Whitbread Prize for Best Novel); Haroun and the Sea of Stories (winner of the Writers Guild Award); The Moor's Last Sigh (winner of the Whitbread Prize for Best Novel); The Ground Beneath Her Feet (winner of the Eurasian section of the Commonwealth Prize); Fury (a New York Times Notable Book); and Shalimar the Clown (a Time Book of the Year). He is also the author of a book of stories, East, West, and three works of nonfiction- Imaginary Homelands, The Jaguar Smile, and The Wizard of Oz. He is co-editor of Mirrorwork, an anthology of contemporary Indian writing.From the Hardcover edition.
 
Published May 27, 2008 by Random House. 370 pages
Genres: History, Literature & Fiction, Action & Adventure. Fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for The Enchantress of Florence

The New York Times

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Salman Rushdie’s new novel reads less like a novel by the author of magical works than a weary, predictable parody of something by John Barth.

Jun 03 2008 | Read Full Review of The Enchantress of Florence: ...

The New York Times

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This ingenious and ambitious novel — no less than a defense of the human imagination — is curiously unmoving.

Jun 08 2008 | Read Full Review of The Enchantress of Florence: ...

The Guardian

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The Enchantress of Florence by Salman Rushdie Buy it from the Guardian bookshop Search the Guardian bookshop In the court of the Mughal emperor Akbar, the sunshine ...

Jan 25 2009 | Read Full Review of The Enchantress of Florence: ...

The Guardian

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The Enchantress of Florence by Salman Rushdie 368pp, Jonathan Cape, £18.99 From the sea of stories our master fisherman has brought up two gleaming, intertwining prizes - a tale about three boys from Florence in the age of Lorenzo de' Medici, and a story of Akbar, greatest of the Mughal emperors,...

Mar 29 2008 | Read Full Review of The Enchantress of Florence: ...

The Guardian

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The Enchantress of Florence by Salman Rushdie Cape £18.99 pp386 No novelist understands the possibilities and perils of globalisation more acutely than Salman Rushdie.

Apr 20 2008 | Read Full Review of The Enchantress of Florence: ...

BC Books

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In Rushdie’s tenth novel, a magical realist every-which-way-but-lucid fever dream, sixteenth-century Renaissance Florence and Mughal India's cultural zenith find a link in a "hidden princess."

May 21 2008 | Read Full Review of The Enchantress of Florence: ...

BC Books

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A historical fantasy that's both a pleasure to read and an education in its recreation of two of history's most fascinating cities.

Jan 02 2009 | Read Full Review of The Enchantress of Florence: ...

BC Books

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An enchanting tale of the East and West and the woman who traversed them, written in post-modern magic realism.

Jun 13 2011 | Read Full Review of The Enchantress of Florence: ...

BC Books

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Instead of narrating the story in a linear unidirectional fashion, where the end of one chapter is the beginning of another chapter, the frame narrative actually engages the reader, as I found myself flipping back to previous chapters, trying to integrate them with the current chapter, seeing ...

Jun 13 2011 | Read Full Review of The Enchantress of Florence: ...

NPR

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In his new novel, The Enchantress of Florence, Salman Rushdie blends history and fantasy to recount the tale of a lost princess. The lavish epic spans multiple decades and continents.

Jul 15 2008 | Read Full Review of The Enchantress of Florence: ...

NPR

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The Enchantress of Florence is the latest novel by Salman Rushdie. The book tells the story of a woman trying to take control of her destiny in a decidedly male world.

Jun 09 2008 | Read Full Review of The Enchantress of Florence: ...

Book Reporter

between competing philosophical schools --- the Water Drinkers,.

Jan 21 2011 | Read Full Review of The Enchantress of Florence: ...

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Marjorie Wittner 4 Oct 2015

Rated the book as 4 out of 5

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