The End of Power by Moises Naim
From Boardrooms to Battlefields and Churches to States, Why Being In Charge Isn't What It Used to Be

73%

8 Critic Reviews

He says that our best defense is to be prepared: we must eschew “dangerously antiquated” notions of power and shift our focus from rising to the top to “inhabit[ing] the middle of the curve in a time of massive and rapid change.” It’s a timely, insightful, and eloquent message.
-Publishers Weekly

Synopsis

We know that power is shifting: From West to East and North to South, from presidential palaces to public squares, from once formidable corporate behemoths to nimble startups and, slowly but surely, from men to women. But power is not merely shifting and dispersing. It is also decaying. Those in power today are more constrained in what they can do with it and more at risk of losing it than ever before.

In The End of Power, award-winning columnist and former Foreign Policy editor Moisés Naím illuminates the struggle between once-dominant megaplayers and the new micropowers challenging them in every field of human endeavor. Drawing on provocative, original research, Naím shows how the antiestablishment drive of micropowers can topple tyrants, dislodge monopolies, and open remarkable new opportunities, but it can also lead to chaos and paralysis. Naím deftly covers the seismic changes underway in business, religion, education, within families, and in all matters of war and peace. Examples abound in all walks of life: In 1977, eighty-nine countries were ruled by autocrats while today more than half the world’s population lives in democracies. CEO’s are more constrained and have shorter tenures than their predecessors. Modern tools of war, cheaper and more accessible, make it possible for groups like Hezbollah to afford their own drones. In the second half of 2010, the top ten hedge funds earned more than the world’s largest six banks combined.

Those in power retain it by erecting powerful barriers to keep challengers at bay. Today, insurgent forces dismantle those barriers more quickly and easily than ever, only to find that they themselves become vulnerable in the process. Accessible and captivating, Naím offers a revolutionary look at the inevitable end of power—and how it will change your world.
 

About Moises Naim

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Moisés Naím is a scholar at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and an internationally syndicated columnist. For over a decade he was the editor-in-chief of Foreign Policy magazine and under his leadership, the magazine was re-launched, won the National Magazine award for General Excellence three times and became one of the world's most influential publications in international affairs. Naím also served as Venezuela's Minister of Industry and Trade and as executive director of the World Bank. Naím holds a PhD from MIT and lives in Washington, DC.
 
Published March 11, 2014 by Basic Books. 322 pages
Genres: Business & Economics, Political & Social Sciences. Non-fiction
Bestseller Status:
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Peak Rank on Jan 25 2015
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Critic reviews for The End of Power
All: 8 | Positive: 6 | Negative: 2

Kirkus

Above average
on Jan 06 2013

The author suggests that coercive potentials are undermined by increasing numbers of people who are healthier and more informed, many of whom live in jurisdictions that are more porous, less deferential to authority and harder to police...A data-packed, intriguing analysis that is not entirely convincing.

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Publishers Weekly

Excellent
on Feb 06 2015

He says that our best defense is to be prepared: we must eschew “dangerously antiquated” notions of power and shift our focus from rising to the top to “inhabit[ing] the middle of the curve in a time of massive and rapid change.” It’s a timely, insightful, and eloquent message.

Read Full Review of The End of Power: From Boardr... | See more reviews from Publishers Weekly

Guardian

Above average
Reviewed by Lili Loofbourow on Jan 15 2015

That Naím doesn’t propose a solution and instead ends the book with a call to inventive arms both saves him from being one of the “terrible simplifiers” he condemns, and confirms The End of Power as an intelligent and engaging — if limited — study that (unlike its title) resists overstatement in favor of nuance.

Read Full Review of The End of Power: From Boardr... | See more reviews from Guardian

WSJ online

Above average
Reviewed by ROBERT B. ZOELLICK on Mar 14 2013

Mr. Naím's main goal is to get his readers to think differently about power. His prescriptions are a little vague...

Read Full Review of The End of Power: From Boardr... | See more reviews from WSJ online

The Washington Post

Above average
Reviewed by Gordon M. Goldstein on Mar 08 2013

Is there a unified theory at the heart of Naim’s highly original, inter-disciplinary meditation on the degeneration of international power?

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Foreign Affairs

Above average
Reviewed by G. John Ikenberry on Mar 17 2013

In this fascinating book, Naím makes the more provocative claim that power is, in fact, declining...Naím might overstate the significance of this change, but his book should provoke a debate about how to govern the world when more and more people are in charge.

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London School of Economics

Above average
Reviewed by Ainsley Elbra on Mar 23 2013

The aim of the book is to ask readers to question the way we think about, talk about, and ultimately understand, power...Overall, however, this contribution is a timely reminder of the changing face of power across many facets of society. The author’s insights into the halls of power, from China to Sweden, make this a fascinating read.

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eInternational Relations

Good
Reviewed by TRISTAN ABBOTT on Mar 07 2015

The value in this book lies in its sharp analysis of modern day power-dynamics, making it a worthwhile read. It offers a clear snapshot of power in the present day, as well as how power has developed in the past.

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