The Fall by Albert Camus

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Synopsis

Elegantly styled, Camus' profoundly disturbing novel of a Parisian lawyer's confessions is a searing study of modern amorality.
 

About Albert Camus

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Albert Camus (1913-1960), Algerian-French novelist, essayist, and playwright, won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1957.
 
Published September 19, 2012 by Vintage. 162 pages
Genres: Literature & Fiction. Fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for The Fall

Kirkus Reviews

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An utterly fascinating book that might with half-truth be called a novel, or a monologue, or a character sketch, but which is largely a philosophical thesis, and inquiry- bristling with wit.

Sep 19 2011 | Read Full Review of The Fall

Publishers Weekly

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With a sharp eye for irony and incongruity, Lottman depicts the darkening of the City of Light during a notably lovely springtime as the German army approached and as rumors ran rampant--for instance, that German agents disguised as beggars, blind men, nuns and wounded French soldiers had infiltr...

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BC Books

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Can a person really be faultless? According to Albert Camus, the answer is no, but that is okay. Th...Albert Camus' most beautiful and least understood novel, The Fall is a witty and terse monologue about the human conscience.

Apr 21 2012 | Read Full Review of The Fall

BC Books

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After all, if one will write a novel about a man, who originally was installed in a social pedestal as an accomplished Parisian lawyer, but who fell into disgrace and descended into the deepest depths of Hell, then what better city to symbolize his location than the dead center of Amsterdam?

Apr 21 2012 | Read Full Review of The Fall

BC Books

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In this way, the reader becomes a character in the novel, and Jean-Baptiste Clamence is directly speaking to the reader.

Apr 21 2012 | Read Full Review of The Fall

Seattle PI

After all, if one will write a novel about a man, who originally was installed in a social pedestal as an accomplished Parisian lawyer, but who fell into disgrace and descended into the deepest depths of Hell, then what better city to symbolize his location than the dead center of Amsterdam?

Apr 22 2012 | Read Full Review of The Fall

The New York Review of Books

He supported the Hungarian rebels—as did Sartre—but, unlike Sartre, drew “European” lessons from their action: “in spite of the dramatic bankruptcy of the traditional movements and ideals of the left, the real Europe exists united in justice and in liberty, confronting all tyrannies.” The Fran...

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