The Fighting Temeraire by Sam Willis
The Battle of Trafalgar and the Ship that Inspired J. M. W. Turner's Most Beloved Painting

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Synopsis

The extraordinary story of the mighty Temeraire, the ship behind J. M. W. Turner's iconic painting The H.M.S. Temeraire, one of Britains most illustrious fighting ships, is known to millions through J.M.W. Turners masterpiece, The Fighting Temeraire (1839), which portrays the battle-scarred veteran of Britain’s wars with Napoleonic France. In this evocative new volume, Sam Willis tells the extraordinary story of the vessel behind the painting.  This tale of two ships spans the heyday of the age of sail: the climaxes of both the Seven Years’ War (1756–63) and the Napoleonic Wars (1798–1815). Filled with richly evocative detail, and narrated with the pace and gusto of a master storyteller, The Fighting Temeraire is an enthralling and deeply satisfying work of narrative history.
 

About Sam Willis

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Sam Willis has lectured at the National Maritime Museum in Greenwich, England, and consults on maritime painting for Christie's. Sam spent eighteen months as a Square Rig Able Sea-man, sailing the tall ships used in the Hornblower television series and award-winning film Shackleton. He is the author of Fighting at Sea in the Eighteenth Century: The Art of Sailing Warfare and the highly successful Fighting Ships series.
 
Published November 15, 2010 by Pegasus. 352 pages
Genres: History, Arts & Photography, Travel, War, Romance, Professional & Technical. Non-fiction

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Willis (Fighting at Sea in the Eighteenth Century: The Art of Sailing Warfare, 2008, etc.) follows the adventures of the Temeraire, which played an integral role in British military successes and was the subject of J.M.W.

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The Wall Street Journal

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Her greatest day came on Oct. 21, 1805, when she followed Nelson's Victory into the melee at Trafalgar, where her 98 guns saved the British flagship, even if they could not save Nelson's life.

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The Wall Street Journal

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She was named for a previous Temeraire, which had been captured by the Royal Navy at the battle of Lagos Bay in 1759.

Dec 11 2010 | Read Full Review of The Fighting Temeraire: The B...

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