The Firm by John Grisham
A Novel

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Synopsis

At the top of his class at Harvard Law, he had  his choice of the best in America. He made a deadly  mistake. When Mitch McDeere signed on with  Bendini, Lambert & Locke of Memphis, he thought he  and his beautiful wife, Abby, were on their way.  The firm leased him a BMW, paid off his school  loans, arranged a mortgage and hired him a  decorator. Mitch McDeere should have remembered what his  brother Ray -- doing fifteen years in a Tennessee  jail -- already knew. You never get nothing for  nothing. Now the FBI has the lowdown on Mitch's  firm and needs his help. Mitch is caught between a  rock and a hard place, with no choice -- if he  wants to live.


From the Hardcover edition.
 

About John Grisham

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Long before his name became synonymous with the modern legal thriller, John Grisham was working 60-70 hours a week at a small Southaven, Mississippi law practice, squeezing in time before going to the office and during courtroom recesses to work on his hobby--writing his first novel. Born on February 8, 1955 in Jonesboro, Arkansas, to a construction worker and a homemaker, John Grisham as a child dreamed of being a professional baseball player. Realizing he didn't have the right stuff for a pro career, he shifted gears and majored in accounting at Mississippi State University. After graduating from law school at Ole Miss in 1981, he went on to practice law for nearly a decade in Southaven, specializing in criminal defense and personal injury litigation. In 1983, he was elected to the state House of Representatives and served until 1990. One day at the DeSoto County courthouse, Grisham overheard the harrowing testimony of a twelve-year-old rape victim and was inspired to start a novel exploring what would have happened if the girl's father had murdered her assailants. Getting up at 5 a.m. every day to get in several hours of writing time before heading off to work, Grisham spent three years on A Time to Kill and finished it in 1987. Initially rejected by many publishers, it was eventually bought by Wynwood Press, who gave it a modest 5,000 copy printing and published it in June 1988. That might have put an end to Grisham's hobby. However, he had already begun his next book, and it would quickly turn that hobby into a new full-time career--and spark one of publishing's greatest success stories. The day after Grisham completed A Time to Kill, he began work on another novel, the story of a hotshot young attorney lured to an apparently perfect law firm that was not what it appeared. When he sold the film rights to The Firm to Paramount Pictures for $600,000, Grisham suddenly became a hot property among publishers, and book rights were bought by Doubleday. Spending 47 weeks on The New York Times bestseller list, The Firm became the bestselling novel of 1991. The successes of The Pelican Brief, which hit number one on the New York Times bestseller list, and The Client, which debuted at number one, confirmed Grisham's reputation as the master of the legal thriller. Grisham's success even renewed interest in A Time to Kill, which was republished in hardcover by Doubleday and then in paperback by Dell. This time around, it was a bestseller. Since first publishing A Time to Kill in 1988, Grisham has written one novel a year (his other books are The Firm, The Pelican Brief, The Client, The Chamber, The Rainmaker, The Runaway Jury, The Partner, The Street Lawyer, The Testament, The Brethren, A Painted House, Skipping Christmas, The Summons, The King of Torts, Bleachers, The Last Juror, The Broker, Playing for Pizza, and The Appeal) and all of them have become international bestsellers. There are currently over 225 million John Grisham books in print worldwide, which have been translated into 29 languages. Nine of his novels have been turned into films (The Firm, The Pelican Brief, The Client, A Time to Kill, The Rainmaker, The Chamber, A Painted House, The Runaway Jury, and Skipping Christmas), as was an original screenplay, The Gingerbread Man. The Innocent Man (October 2006) marked his first foray into non-fiction. Grisham lives with his wife Renee and their two children Ty and Shea. The family splits their time between their Victorian home on a farm in Mississippi and a plantation near Charlottesville, VA. Grisham took time off from writing for several months in 1996 to return, after a five-year hiatus, to the courtroom. He was honoring a commitment made before he had retired from the law to become a full-time writer: representing the family of a railroad brakeman killed when he was pinned between two cars. Preparing his case with the same passion and dedication as his books' protagonists, Grisham successfully argued his clients' case, earning them a jury award of $683,500--the biggest verdict of his career. When he's not writing, Grisham devotes time to charitable causes, including most recently his Rebuild The Coast Fund, which raised 8.8 million dollars for Gulf Coast relief in the wake of Hurricane Katrina. He also keeps up with his greatest passion: baseball. The man who dreamed of being a professional baseball player now serves as the local Little League commissioner. The six ballfields he built on his property have played host to over 350 kids on 26 Little League teams. "From the Paperback edition.
 
Published January 3, 2012 by Random House Large Print. 624 pages
Genres: Mystery, Thriller & Suspense, Literature & Fiction, Biographies & Memoirs, Action & Adventure. Fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for The Firm

Kirkus Reviews

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Although the firm knows McDeere is a spy and sets him up for assassination, he is smarter than even the reader knows and fights back against both the firm and the FBI.

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Publishers Weekly

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This smart and smooth audio edition of Grisham’s 1991 novel—now a television series on NBC—about attorney Mitch McDeere and his wife, Abby, captures everything that made the book so popular. Narrator

Mar 26 2012 | Read Full Review of The Firm: A Novel

Publishers Weekly

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MC suggests addding some info along the lines of `a surprise bestseller in hardcover...'/i think this is interesting but it goes beyond the specifications laid out by george of a very brief description of book/pk Author tour.

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Publishers Weekly

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This smart and smooth audio edition of Grisham’s 1991 novel—now a television series on NBC—about attorney Mitch McDeere and his wife, Abby, captures everything that made the book so popular. Narrator

Mar 26 2012 | Read Full Review of The Firm: A Novel

Publishers Weekly

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Grisham's gripping fiction debut describes the inner workings of a law firm set up by the Mafia to launder money and concoct tax evasions.

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Entertainment Weekly

At least it delivers the cinematic analog of a Grisham book-delivers more, actually, since the performances make the characters resonate in a way that Grisham's flat prose (''with tired eyes, no makeup, and wet hair, she was beautiful'') can never quite manage.

Dec 23 1994 | Read Full Review of The Firm: A Novel

Entertainment Weekly

Once the preliminaries are out of the way, however, The Firm turns into a relatively ingenious man-in-the-middle thriller, with the resourceful McDeere, his loyal wife, and his equally brilliant brother — a convicted murderer with a knack for foreign languages — on the run from two ruthless adv...

Mar 08 1991 | Read Full Review of The Firm: A Novel

Los Angeles Times

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MOVIE REVIEW : The Firm of Julia, Denzel, Grisham & Pakula : 'The Pelican Brief' is based on a hot novel, has bankable stars and a director noted for his work with thrillers.

Dec 17 1993 | Read Full Review of The Firm: A Novel

Pajiba

But as “The Firm’s” pilot opens, Mitch again is running for his life, this time dodging tourists at the Lincoln Memorial and calling Abby from a pay phone to tell her “it’s happening again.” We’re then taken back six weeks, which is still 10 years after the Memphis events, to see just how Mitch e...

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Common Sense Media

So when Bandini Lambert and Locke, a small Memphis law firm, offer him a huge salary, a house, a car and, most importantly, a sense of family, he moves his life, and his wife, Abby (Jeanne Tripplehorn, who looks oddly similar to Katherine Heigl in this film) to the south.

May 21 2007 | Read Full Review of The Firm: A Novel

The Hollywood Reporter

(At the end of the 1993 film with Tom Cruise, Mitch "felt he was free and clear, that he had come up with an ingenious solution that assisted the feds in taking down the law firm but did not incur the wrath of the Moralto mob," Reiter explained.) PHOTOS: Hollywood's A-List Redefined With two p...

Jan 08 2012 | Read Full Review of The Firm: A Novel

HitFix

(The dismal performance of TNT's "Innocent" last month can't have given NBC a lot of confidence, even though the circumstances aren't exactly the same and Lucas was considered a movie star much more recently than Bill Pullman.) Brand names can sometimes help with awareness - or, in the case of "P...

Jan 05 2012 | Read Full Review of The Firm: A Novel

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