The Flamethrowers by Rachel Kushner

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Synopsis

* Shortlisted for the Folio Prize 2014*



*Longlisted for the Baileys Women's Prize for Fiction*



Reno mounts her motorcycle and sets a collision course for New York.



In 1977 the city is alive with art, sensuality and danger. She falls in with a bohemian clique colonising downtown and the lines between reality and performance begin to bleed.



A passionate affair with the scion of an Italian tyre empire carries Reno to Milan, where she is swept along by the radical left and drawn into a spiral of violence and betrayal.



The Flamethrowers is an audacious novel that explores the perplexing allure of femininity, fakery and fear. In Reno we encounter a heroine like no other.



Best Books of the Year:


* Guardian * New York Times * The Times * Observer * Financial Times * New Yorker * Telegraph * Slate * Oprah * Vogue * Time * Scotsman * Evening Standard *



Shortlisted for the National Book Awards 2013

 

About Rachel Kushner

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Rachel Kushner’s debut novel, Telex from Cuba, was a finalist for the 2008 National Book Award and the Dayton Literary Peace Prize, winner of the California Book Award, and a New York Times bestseller and Notable Book. Her fiction and essays have appeared in The New York Times, The Believer, Artforum, Bookforum, Fence, Bomb, Cabinet, and Grand Street. She lives in Los Angeles.
 
Published June 6, 2013 by Vintage Digital. 404 pages
Genres: Literature & Fiction. Fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for The Flamethrowers

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Jan 02 2018 | Read Full Review of The Flamethrowers

https://lareviewofbooks.org

It shrewdly defies what we expect from a political novel, or an expatriate novel, or even a gay novel set in the 1990s.

Dec 25 2013 | Read Full Review of The Flamethrowers

Boston Review

Rather than merely mock or lament the irrelevance and disconnectedness of her characters, Kushner suggests that it is possible to appreciate a social world made of individually intricate but not strongly interrelated or mutually illuminating parts.

Nov 21 2013 | Read Full Review of The Flamethrowers

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