The Freedom Paradox by Clive Hamilton
Towards a Post-secular Ethics

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The Freedom Paradox: Towards a Post-Secular Ethics is recommended reading for anyone who is searching for an explanation to the niggling feeling that something isn't quite right about the western way of life.
-M/C Anderson

Synopsis

In this book, Hamilton forms a radical reconsideration of the meaning of freedom in the modern world, and a proposal for what he calls a "post-secular ethics"—an ethics to supercede the mores of the post-1968 Western world. Despite all of the personal and political freedoms we now enjoy in the West, Clive argues that our "inner freedom," our very human capacity for considered will and the very ethical basis of our society, has been compromised by our relentless focus on impulse and immediate gratification. Drawing on the great metaphysical philosophers Kant and Schopenhauer, Hamilton develops a new theory of morality for our times. He argues that true inner freedom and acting according to moral law are one and the same, and essential to reaching psychological maturity.

 

About Clive Hamilton

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Clive Hamilton is the author of Affluenza, Growth Fetish, and Requiem for a Species.
 
Published August 1, 2008 by Allen & Unwin. 290 pages
Genres: Political & Social Sciences, Law & Philosophy. Non-fiction
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Critic reviews for The Freedom Paradox
All: 2 | Positive: 1 | Negative: 1

The Sydney Morning Herald

Below average
on Sep 26 2008

Not wanting to sound prolier than thou but, when academics start using phrases like "consumer conformity", my hackles rise.

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M/C Anderson

Good
on Oct 30 2008

The Freedom Paradox: Towards a Post-Secular Ethics is recommended reading for anyone who is searching for an explanation to the niggling feeling that something isn't quite right about the western way of life.

Read Full Review of The Freedom Paradox: Towards ...

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