The Funeral Party by Ludmila Ulitskaya

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August 1991. In a sweltering New York City apartment, a group of Russian émigrés gathers round the deathbed of an artist named Alik, a charismatic character beloved by them all, especially the women who take turns nursing him as he fades from this world. Their reminiscences of the dying man and of their lives in Russia are punctuated by debates and squabbles: Whom did Alik love most? Should he be baptized before he dies, as his alcoholic wife, Nina, desperately wishes, or be reconciled to the faith of his birth by a rabbi who happens to be on hand? And what will be the meaning for them of the Yeltsin putsch, which is happening across the world in their long-lost Moscow but also right before their eyes on CNN?

This marvelous group of individuals inhabits the first novel by Ludmila Ulitskaya to be published in English, a book that was shortlisted for the Russian Booker Prize and has been praised wherever translated editions have appeared. Simultaneously funny and sad, lyrical in its Russian sorrow and devastatingly keen in its observation of character, The Funeral Party introduces to our shores a wonderful writer who captures, wryly and tenderly, our complex thoughts and emotions confronting life and death, love and loss, homeland and exile.

From the Hardcover edition.

About Ludmila Ulitskaya

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LUDMILA ULITSKAYA was born in the Urals. Shortly before perestroika she became Repertory Director of the Hebrew Theatre of Moscow. She is the author of fourteen fiction books, three children's books and six plays. She is Russia's bestselling novelist.
Published December 1, 2010 by Schocken. 162 pages
Genres: Education & Reference, Literature & Fiction. Fiction

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This nicely constructed and deeply felt novel, which marks the first English-language appearance of a former Russian scientist and translator, deftly observes the interactions of several Russian immigrants in America at the time of the breakup of the Soviet Union.

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Publishers Weekly

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Maika, the 15-year-old daughter of his ex-lover, Irina, is upset that no one understands Alik's jokes now that the man is sick.Ulitskaya uses the loved ones' varying emigration experiences to underscore their attempts to respect one another's places in Alik's life and at his deathbed.

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