The Globalization Paradox by Dani Rodrik
Democracy and the Future of the World Economy

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Synopsis

Surveying three centuries of economic history, a Harvard professor argues for a leaner global system that puts national democracies front and center.

From the mercantile monopolies of seventeenth-century empires to the modern-day authority of the WTO, IMF, and World Bank, the nations of the world have struggled to effectively harness globalization's promise. The economic narratives that underpinned these eras—the gold standard, the Bretton Woods regime, the "Washington Consensus"—brought great success and great failure. In this eloquent challenge to the reigning wisdom on globalization, Dani Rodrik offers a new narrative, one that embraces an ineluctable tension: we cannot simultaneously pursue democracy, national self-determination, and economic globalization. When the social arrangements of democracies inevitably clash with the international demands of globalization, national priorities should take precedence. Combining history with insight, humor with good-natured critique, Rodrik's case for a customizable globalization supported by a light frame of international rules shows the way to a balanced prosperity as we confront today's global challenges in trade, finance, and labor markets.
 

About Dani Rodrik

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Dani Rodrik is the Rafiq Hariri Professor of International Political Economy at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. He lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts.
 
Published February 21, 2011 by W. W. Norton & Company. 368 pages
Genres: Business & Economics, Political & Social Sciences, Education & Reference. Non-fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for The Globalization Paradox

Kirkus Reviews

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Rodrik argues that the least important element in terms of the world’s economic, social and political health is globalization itself, noting that economic models predict only minimal net gain from the continued lowering of international barriers.

Feb 21 2011 | Read Full Review of The Globalization Paradox: De...

New York Journal of Books

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They burrow into economic caves, find a shard of collateralized debt obligation, and chew over a hieroglyphic handed down from Greenspan or Keynes.Of course, one might be forgiven for asking economists who delve into the sins of the past decade, “Where were you guys when this was happening?”To hi...

Feb 21 2011 | Read Full Review of The Globalization Paradox: De...

Zimbio

It’s March, 2013′s Book of the Month Review (BOTM) time, and this month it’s Dani Johnson’s “First Steps to Wealth”.

Jun 30 2011 | Read Full Review of The Globalization Paradox: De...

Seeking Alpha

We also invite Rodrik to join the over 80 world expert signers of Ethical Markets statement on Transforming Finance at www.transformingfinance.net which acknowledges finance as part of the global commons.

Apr 24 2011 | Read Full Review of The Globalization Paradox: De...

London School of Economics

was hailed as one of the best economics books of that decade by Business Week, and was a forerunner to The Globalisation Paradox, in which Rodrik sets out the perils of financial globalization without any constraints, as he says perfectly evidenced by the most recent financial crisis and the rapi...

May 22 2011 | Read Full Review of The Globalization Paradox: De...

London School of Economics

was hailed as one of the best economics books of that decade by Business Week, and was a forerunner to The Globalisation Paradox, in which Rodrik sets out the perils of financial globalization without any constraints, as he says perfectly evidenced by the most recent financial crisis and the rapi...

May 22 2011 | Read Full Review of The Globalization Paradox: De...

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