The Golden Age by John C. Wright

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The Golden Age is Grand Space Opera, a large-scale SF adventure novel in the tradition of A. E. Van vogt and Roger Zelazny, with perhaps a bit of Cordwainer Smith enriching the style. It is an astounding story of super science, a thrilling wonder story that recaptures the excitements of SF's golden age writers.

The Golden Age takes place 10,000 years in the future in our solar system, an interplanetary utopian society filled with immortal humans. Within the frame of a traditional tale-the one rebel who is unhappy in utopia-Wright spins an elaborate plot web filled with suspense and passion.

Phaethon, of Radamanthus House, is attending a glorious party at his family mansion to celebrate the thousand-year anniversary of the High Transcendence. There he meets first an old man who accuses him of being an impostor and then a being from Neptune who claims to be an old friend. The Neptunian tells him that essential parts of his memory were removed and stored by the very government that Phaethon believes to be wholly honorable. It shakes his faith. He is an exile from himself.

And so Phaethon embarks upon a quest across the transformed solar system--Jupiter is now a second sun, Mars and Venus terraformed, humanity immortal--among humans, intelligent machines, and bizarre life forms that are partly both, to recover his memory, and to learn what crime he planned that warranted such preemptive punishment. His quest is to regain his true identity.

The Golden Age is one of the major, ambitious SF novels of the year and the international launch of an important new writer in the genre.

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About John C. Wright

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JOHN C. WRIGHT is an attorney turned SF and fantasy writer. He has published short fiction in Asimov's SF and elsewhere, and wrote the Chronicles of Chaos, The Golden Age, and The War of Dreaming series. His novel Orphans of Chaos was a finalist for the Nebula Award in 2005. The Hermetic Millennia is his second novel in the Count to a Trillion series.
Published January 18, 2003 by Tor Books. 416 pages
Genres: Science Fiction & Fantasy, Literature & Fiction. Fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for The Golden Age

Kirkus Reviews

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Through diligent searching assisted by Rhadamanthus, his House's Sophotect, Phaethon finds that he's invested enormous resources in building a spacesuit of an impervious wonder-metal, and learns that he voluntarily agreed to sequester his memories.

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Publishers Weekly

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A movie based on Wright's modernized space opera could easily appeal to fans of The Matrix : both contain a charming bulletproof last-best-hope-of-mankind protagonist, sociological philosophy debated by hyperintelligent computers and fanatically purposeful people, and exciting (but relatively uni...

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Publishers Weekly

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To make their dramas resonant today, the author uses echoes of mythology both classic (like his namesake, Phaethon is punished for soaring too high) and contemporary (SF fans will enjoy nods to modern masters Wells, Lovecraft and Vance).

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SF Site

Wright's first novel, The Golden Age, is in some ways a throw-back to the grand, extravagant visions of SF's past.

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SF Signal

Either way, I found this book to be even more enjoyable than the previous two books.

Jun 15 2004 | Read Full Review of The Golden Age

SF Signal

Despite having superheroes as parents, life hasn’t been all that pleasant for Celia.

Apr 04 2012 | Read Full Review of The Golden Age

SF Signal

The fascinating futuristic science presented here assaults the reader at dizzying speeds and invoking the sense of wonder present in most science fiction of the Golden Age.

Dec 11 2003 | Read Full Review of The Golden Age

Strange Horizons

While it seems unlikely that Wright's work will match Gibson's by inspiring a subgenre of its own, that is no criticism of Wright's creative prowess.

Sep 02 2002 | Read Full Review of The Golden Age

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