The Golden Goose by Brothers Grimm

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Synopsis

Here is a classic, comic tale from Grimm about a kind-hearted young man called Simpleton whose generosity is rewarded in strange and wonderful ways.

 

About Brothers Grimm

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URI SHULEVITZ received the Caldecott Medal for "The Fool of the World and the Flying Ship" by Arthur Ransome. He is the author and illustrator of numerous books, including two Caldecott Honor Books, "Snow" and "The Treasure," and, most recently, "So Sleepy Story," one of "Time" magazine's "7 Books Kids Will Love." He lives in New York City. After studying at Marburg, Jacob became a clerk in the War Office at Kassel, and in 1808 librarian to Jerome Bonaparte, King of Westphalia. In 1841 he received Professorship at Berlin, and in 1854 began work on Deutsches Worterbuch with his brother. Jacob W. Grimm (1785-1863) and his brother Wilhelm K. Grimm (1786-1859) pioneered the study of German philosophy, law, mythology and folklore, but they are best known for their collection of fairy tales. These include such popular stories as Red Riding Hood, Sleeping Beauty and The Frog Prince. Commonly referred to now as Grimm's Fairy Tales, their collection was published as Kinder-und-Hausmarchen (Children's and Household Tales, 1812-15). The brothers were born thirteen months apart in the German province of Hesse, and were inseparable from childhood. Throughout their lives they showed a marked lack of sibling rivalry. Most of their works were written together, a practice begun in childhood when they shared a desk and sustained throughout their adult lives. Since their lives and work were so collaborative, it is difficult now to differentiate between them, but of course there were differences.- Jacob, who studied for a time in Paris, was fascinated with variant spellings of older words. He articulated "Grimm's Law," the rules of which are still used today to determine correspondences between the consonants of German and languages in the Indo-European family. Jacob was bolder and more experimental than Wilhelm, and was rumored to be a lively dancer. Throughout his life, Jacob kept rigidly to schedule and could be extremely focused on work that demanded close attention to detail. He never married, but was a loving uncle to Wilhelm's children. Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm are buried side by side in Berlin.
 
Published December 1, 1951 by Oxford University Press. 76 pages
Genres: Children's Books, Literature & Fiction, Nature & Wildlife, Political & Social Sciences. Fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for The Golden Goose

Kirkus Reviews

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He deliberately creates dissonance between text and pictures, and the success of this varies from page to page: Several tableaux of trains of characters behind the oblivious simpleton are perfect in timing and delivery, but offer no clue as to why everyone comes unstuck.

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Publishers Weekly

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A simpleton is given a magical goose and makes a perpetually serious princess laugh. This happy tale receives wonderfully puckish treatment from Shulevitz. [His] stylish artwork conjures up an old w

Mar 02 1998 | Read Full Review of The Golden Goose

Publishers Weekly

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A simpleton is given a magical goose and makes a perpetually serious princess laugh.

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Publishers Weekly

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Duntze's stylized, decorative paintings capture the sly wit in this classic tale.

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Publishers Weekly

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Through his kindness to a troll, Hans, the cherubic son of a woodcutter, finds a goose ""with feathers of pure gold."" In a departure from the Grimm model, the goose informs Hans that it belongs to Princess Rosamund, and Hans immediately sets off for Rosamund's castle.

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Publishers Weekly

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From the lighter side of the Brothers Grimm, this happy tale of luck and folly receives wonderfully puckish treatment from Shulevitz (who manages to reprise the hilarious contraption he created for The Fool of the World and the Flying Ship).

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Examiner

With the help of the little gray man and the golden goose, the man wins the princess and lives happily ever after.

Oct 09 2012 | Read Full Review of The Golden Goose

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