The Grandmothers by Doris Lessing
Four Short Novels

No critic rating

Waiting for minimum critic reviews

See 1 Critic Review

If her targets tend to the obvious, Lessing's waspish satire can be amusing enough, despite opaque and careless prose (names in "The Grandmothers" are mistakenly transposed). "A Love Child" is more ambitious, appearing to present the loss, waste and self-delusion of a generation through a single romantic dreamer.
-Guardian

Synopsis

In the title novel, two friends fall in love with each other's teenage sons, and these passions last for years, until the women end them, vowing a respectable old age. In Victoria and the Staveneys, a young woman gives birth to a child of mixed race and struggles with feelings of estrangement as her daughter gets drawn into a world of white privilege. The Reason for It traces the birth, faltering, and decline of an ancient culture, with enlightening modern resonances. A Love Child features a World War II soldier who believes he has fathered a love child during a fleeting wartime romance and cannot be convinced otherwise.

 

About Doris Lessing

See more books from this Author
Born in Kermanshah, Persia (later Iran) on October 22, 1919, Doris Lessing grew up in Rhodesia (the present-day Zimbabwe). Her father was an amputee due to injuries received in World War I and, and her mother had treated his war injuries. As a child, Lessing explored the rural Rhodesian landscape, occasionally hunting small animals. While working as an au pair and a telephone operator in Salisbury, Rhodesia, Lessing read such authors as Chekhov and Tolstoy, refined her writing skills, and married twice. During her two marriages, she submitted short fiction and poetry for publication and, after moving to London in 1949 with her son, Peter, Lessing published her first novel, The Grass is Singing, in 1950. This work treated apartheid/racial issues that existed in Rhodesia at that time. She would go on to explore the individual's--women's in particular--relationship to society in many types of experimental fiction thereafter. Lessing has published many solid short-story collections but is perhaps best known for her 1954 Somerset Maugham Award-winning experimental novel The Golden Notebook. She has received numerous awards for her work including the 2001 Prince of Asturias Prize in Literature, the David Cohen British Literature Prize, and the 2007 Nobel Prize for Literature. Lessing has also had a lifelong interest in such topics as Marxism, telepathy, and social psychology.
 
Published October 13, 2009 by HarperCollins e-books. 328 pages
Genres: Literature & Fiction. Fiction
Add Critic Review

Critic reviews for The Grandmothers
All: 1 | Positive: 0 | Negative: 1

Guardian

Above average
Reviewed by Maya Jaggi on Nov 21 2003

If her targets tend to the obvious, Lessing's waspish satire can be amusing enough, despite opaque and careless prose (names in "The Grandmothers" are mistakenly transposed). "A Love Child" is more ambitious, appearing to present the loss, waste and self-delusion of a generation through a single romantic dreamer.

Read Full Review of The Grandmothers: Four Short ... | See more reviews from Guardian

Reader Rating for The Grandmothers
74%

An aggregated and normalized score based on 47 user ratings from iDreamBooks & iTunes


Rate this book!

Add Review
×