The Great Northern Brotherhood of Canadian Cartoonists by Seth

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The critic Jeet Heer has described Seth as a “late-born nationalist” with an ironic bent, and his fabricated Group of Seven comics force cartooning into Canadian iconography while slyly inverting the medium’s recent gains of cultural capital.
-National Post arts

Synopsis


THE COMPANION GRAPHIC NOVEL TO WIMBLEDON GREEN

Whenever you're in Dominion, on Milverton Street you will stumble across an arresting array of handsome old buildings. The one with the pink stone façade and the familiar Canadian cartoon characters over the doorway is the Dominion branch of the Great Northern Brotherhood of Canadian Cartoonists, erected in 1935 and the last standing building of the once prestigious members-only organization. For years, this building, filled with art deco lamps, simple handcrafted wood furniture, and halls and halls of black-and-white portraits of Canada's best cartoonists, was where the professionals of the Great White North's active comics community met―so active that there were outposts in Montreal and Winnipeg, with headquarters in Toronto. Everyone from all branches of the industry―newspaper strips, gag cartoons, nickel-backs, comic books, political art, accordion books, graphic novels―gathered in their dark green blazers to drink cocktails, eat, dance, and discuss all things cartooning.

Seth opens up his sketchbook to an unseen world of Canadian comics, sometimes fictional and sometimes not, sometimes humorous and sometimes bittersweet, but always fascinating in its creative exploration of Canadian comics history. Whereas Wimbledon Green celebrated the comics collectors, The Great Northern Brotherhood of Canadian Cartoonists celebrates the cartoonists the comic collectors love.

 

About Seth

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SETH is the cartoonist of Clyde Fans; It's a Good Life, If You Don't Weaken; Wimbledon Green; George Sprott; Bannock, Beans, and Black Tea; and Vernacular Drawings; the designer of the New York Times bestselling Peanuts collections; and a New Yorker illustrator. He lives in Guelph, Ontario.
 
Published October 11, 2011 by Drawn and Quarterly. 136 pages
Genres: Comics & Graphic Novels, Literature & Fiction. Fiction
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Critic reviews for The Great Northern Brotherhood of Canadian Cartoonists
All: 2 | Positive: 2 | Negative: 0

Globe and Mail

Good
Reviewed by KENTON SMITH on Sep 06 2012

...at best, it’s a reflection of the continually growing recognition comic art is now enjoying. Given such often-wondrous output as The Great Northern Brotherhood, it’s no marvel.

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National Post arts

Above average
Reviewed by Chris Randle on Oct 14 2011

The critic Jeet Heer has described Seth as a “late-born nationalist” with an ironic bent, and his fabricated Group of Seven comics force cartooning into Canadian iconography while slyly inverting the medium’s recent gains of cultural capital.

Read Full Review of The Great Northern Brotherhoo... | See more reviews from National Post arts

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