The Health of Nations by Ichiro Kawachi
Why Inequality is Harmful to Your Health

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Synopsis

A powerful demonstration of how global economic inequality is undermining our nation's health and our quality of life. Applying to the United States the kind of scrutiny that Nobel-prize winning economist Amartya Sen has devoted to developing countries, The Health of Nations demonstrates that growing inequality is undermining health, welfare, and community life in America. Harvard professors Ichiro Kawachi and Bruce P. Kennedy review the social costs of inequality, revealing that the United States and other wealthy countries with high levels of social inequality have lower general health than do more equitable societies, rich or poor. , The Health of Nations makes an urgent argument for social justice as the necessary vehicle for the betterment of society, including improving the health of our bodies and our body politic. Synthesizing years of groundbreaking research on the connections between social structures and health and welfare, Kawachi and Kennedy show that the cost of inequality is greater than we realize. They dramatically demonstrate that growing inequalities, far from being a benign by-product of capitalism, threaten the very freedoms that economic development is thought to bring about: freedom from want, freedom from ill health, freedom to exercise democratic choice, and freedom to pursue leisure and happiness. In the vein of Robert D. Putnam's Bowling Alone, The Health of Nations is a major new work of social science with dramatic implications for public policy.
 

About Ichiro Kawachi

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Ichiro Kawachi is a Professor of Social Epidemiology in the Department of Society, Human Development, and Health at the Harvard School of Public Health. He is also Director of the Harvard Center for Society and Health. He has authored several books with Oxford University Press and New Press on society and health. S.V. Subramanian is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Society, Human Development and Health at the Harvard School of Public Health. He has a PhD in geography with specialization in multilevel statistical methods, and he also has a master's degree in the field of development studies. Daniel Kim is a Canadian Institutes of Health Research Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the Department of Society, Human Development, and Health at the Harvard School of Public Health. Dr. Kim completed his medical degree, master's degree in epidemiology, and medical residency training in community medicine, all at the University of Toronto, and a Master of Public Health degree from the Harvard School of Public Health. He is also currently completing his Doctor of Public Health degree at the Harvard School of Public Health. Kennedy is a deputy director of public health practice at the Harvard School of Public Health.
 
Published January 1, 2002 by New Press. 272 pages
Genres: Business & Economics, Political & Social Sciences, Education & Reference, Professional & Technical, Biographies & Memoirs, Law & Philosophy, Health, Fitness & Dieting. Non-fiction

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However, this unprecedented success comes at a cost in terms of social equity and the distribution of goods and services around the world: 200 years ago, the difference in per-capita income between the richest nation, the United Kingdom, and the poorest, China, was a mere $1,200 (in dollars adju...

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Following up on studies like The Loss of Happiness in Market Democracies, The Health of Nations: Why Inequality Is Harmful to Your Health is a timely summation of recent economic research that shows how extreme prosperity always comes at the expense of others' poverty and perhaps of one's own...

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