The Hide by Barry Unsworth

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"[The Hide] has it all: imagination, character, dialogue and above all, plot. . . . It's a scary book, written by a master tale-teller."—Susan Salter Reynolds, Los Angeles Times Book Review

This early work by the Booker Prize-winning author Barry Unsworth chronicles one of his literary obsessions the corruption of innocence and forms it into a compelling contemporary narrative set in the rambling, overgrown grounds of an English estate. There, relying on his rich sister Audrey's beneficence, Simon obsessively digs a secret system of tunnels from which to spy on others. When Josh, a good-looking naïf, becomes a gardener at Audrey's home, the two women of the household, Audrey and her distant relative and housekeeper, Marion, find Josh's strength and seeming innocence a potent spell, and his response escalates unacknowledged tensions between them. Meanwhile, Simon, worried about Josh, takes steps to prevent the exposure of his underground labyrinth. The explosive chemistry between the characters will eventually rip apart and rearrange all their lives.

About Barry Unsworth

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Barry Unsworth was born in Wingate, England on August 10, 1930. He received an undergraduate degree in English from the University of Manchester in 1951. He started out writing short stories, but soon switched to novels. His first novel, The Partnership, was published in 1966. He wrote 17 novels during his lifetime including Stone Virgin, Losing Nelson, The Songs of the Kings, Land of Marvels, and The Quality of Mercy. Sacred Hunger won a Booker Prize in 1992. Morality Play and Pascali's Island were both made into feature films. He died from lung cancer on June 5, 2012 at the age of 81.
Published April 1, 1970 by Littlehampton Book Services Ltd. 192 pages
Genres: Literature & Fiction, Education & Reference, War. Fiction

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Marion and Audrey are both giddy in Josh's virile presence, Audrey thinking herself his patron when she finds that he has a real talent for woodcarving.

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