The Honor Code by Kwame Anthony Appiah
How Moral Revolutions Happen

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...toggles easily between vastly different cultural viewpoints. He’s a walking moral interpreter, a suave if sometimes smug ambassador of ideas.
-National Post arts

Synopsis

"[Appiah's] work reveals the heart and sensitivity of a novelist. . . .Fascinating, erudite and beautifully written."—The New York Times Book Review


In this groundbreaking work, Kwame Anthony Appiah, hailed as "one of the most relevant philosophers today" (New York Times Book Review), changes the way we understand human behavior and the way social reform is brought about. In brilliantly arguing that new democratic movements over the last century have not been driven by legislation from above, Appiah explores the end of the duel in aristocratic England, the tumultuous struggles over footbinding in nineteenth-century China, the uprising of ordinary people against Atlantic slavery, and the horrors of "honor killing" in contemporary Pakistan. Intertwining philosophy and historical narrative, he has created "a fascinating study of moral evolution" (Philadelphia Inquirer) that demonstrates the critical role honor plays a in the struggle against man's inhumanity to man.
 

About Kwame Anthony Appiah

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Kwame Anthony Appiah, the president of the PEN American Center, is the author of The Ethics of Identity, Thinking It Through: An Introduction to Contemporary Philosophy, The Honor Code, and the prize-winning Cosmopolitanism. Raised in Ghana and educated in England, he has taught philosophy on three continents and is currently a professor at Princeton University.
 
Published September 6, 2011 by W. W. Norton & Company. 288 pages
Genres: History, Political & Social Sciences, Law & Philosophy. Non-fiction
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National Post arts

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Reviewed by DWIGHT GARNER on Nov 08 2010

...toggles easily between vastly different cultural viewpoints. He’s a walking moral interpreter, a suave if sometimes smug ambassador of ideas.

Read Full Review of The Honor Code: How Moral Rev... | See more reviews from National Post arts

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