The Hope, A Novel by Herman Wouk

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Synopsis

“One of our best writers today—a modern Charles Dickens—is Herman Wouk… The Hope is not only a good read, but it also causes a good think.”
William Safire, New York Times

Starting in 1948 and reaching its climax during the Six-Day War of 1967, The Hope begins the story of Israel, a country fighting for its life—outmatched and surrounded by enemies. Zev Barak, Sam Pasternak, Don Kishote, and Benny Luria are all officers in the Israeli Army, caught up in the sweep of history, fighting the desperate desert battles and meeting the larger-than-life personalities that shaped Israel’s fight for independence. The four heroes, and the women they love—three Israelis and one American—weave a compelling tapestry of individual destinies through the grand social history of one nation’s struggle against the odds.

Their story—and Israel’s—is concluded in The Glory, which picks up from the Six-Day War and carries through to the hope for peace of the Camp David accords. In this two-part epic, Pulitzer Prize–winning author Herman Wouk brings out the passion, romance, and heroism of Israel’s struggle for survival—adding to his oeuvre yet another enthralling saga that’s impossible to put down.

About the Author
Herman Wouk is one of the most widely-read American authors in the world. His books have been translated into 27 languages, and many of his works have become best sellers. He is perhaps best known for The Winds of War and War and Remembrance, an exhaustively-researched two-part historical series telling the story of World War II from the perspective of two fictional families whose lives were irrevocably changed by the war and the Holocaust. Sixteen years in the making, the epic involved extensive archival research including travel for research to England, Germany, Italy, Poland, and Israel. The Winds of War and War and Remembrance were adapted for television in a thirty-hour series that won the 1989 Emmy Award for Outstanding Miniseries and was, according to ABC, “the most watched television show in history.”

Born in New York City to Russian-Jewish parents, Wouk graduated from Columbia University and started out working as a comedy writer for Fred Allen’s radio show. After the attack on Pearl Harbor in December 1941, he joined the Navy, serving in eight Pacific invasions and earning several battle stars. During his service in the Pacific he had turned to writing, like Lieutenant Keefer in The Caine Mutiny, for an hour or two before dawn. After his discharge in 1946, Wouk finished his first novel, which became a Book-of-the-Month Club selection, and he soon followed up with the international best sellers The Caine Mutiny, and Marjorie Morningstar.

Wouk won the 1952 Pulitzer Prize for fiction for The Caine Mutiny. He has also been awarded numerous academic honors, including a degree from the Hebrew University in Jerusalem. In January 2001, UC San Diego established the Herman Wouk Chair of Modern Jewish Studies, and in 2008 he was given the first Library of Congress Lifetime Achievement Award for the Writing of Fiction.
 

About Herman Wouk

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Herman Wouk, 1915 - Writer Herman Wouk was born in New York into a family of Jewish immigrants from Russia. He attended Columbia University, New York where he edited the college humor magazine and received an A.B. degree. In 1936, he became a radio scriptwriter with Fred Allen. In 1941, he served the U.S. government by producing radio broadcasts to sell war bonds. He joined the United States Navy and served in the Pacific. He began his first novel during off-duty hours at sea. Wouk has been a full-time writer since 1946. He was a visiting professor at Yeshiva University, New York, 1958, a Trustee of the College of the Virgin Islands, 1961-69, a member of the Board of Directors of Washington National Symphony, 1969-71, a scholar-in-residence at Aspen Institute, Colorado, 1973-74, and a member of the Board of Directors of Kennedy Center Productions, 1974-75. Wouk's debut novel was "Aurora Dawn" (1947) which was a satire about the New York advertising business and was followed by "City Boy" (1948) a partly autobiographical story of a Bronx boy. "The Caine Mutiny," the story of the neurotic and paranoid Captain Queeg aboard the USS Caine, was awarded the 1952 Pulitzer Prize for fiction. "Marjorie Morningstar" (1955) was a story of a New York Jewish girl who has great ambitions but ends up a housewife. "This Is My God" (1959) introduces the reader to Jewish orthodoxy. "The Winds of War" (1971) tells the story of the Henry family members and the events that lead up to the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. "War and Remembrance" (1978) concludes the story and tries to explain the causes and implications of war. Wouk's novels are admired for their historical accuracy, satire and humor. He has received several awards which include the Pulitzer Prize (1952), Columbia University Medal of Excellence (1952), Hamilton Medal (1980), America Academy of Achievement Golden Plate Award (1986),Washingtonian Award (1986), U.S. Navy Memorial Foundation Award (1987), and the Kazetnik Award (1990). Wouk has also received many honorary degrees from American and Israeli universities. The first Library of Congress Lifetime Achievement Award for the Writing of Fiction was awarded Wouk in 2008.
 
Published December 2, 2014 by RosettaBooks. 706 pages
Genres: Literature & Fiction, History, War, Political & Social Sciences, Mystery, Thriller & Suspense, Action & Adventure, Biographies & Memoirs, Education & Reference. Fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for The Hope, A Novel

Kirkus Reviews

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Schmaltzy, workmanlike epic of Israel's formative years: Wouk's tenth novel.

May 20 2010 | Read Full Review of The Hope, A Novel

Publishers Weekly

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In the Historical Notes to this solid saga encapsulating three Israeli-Arab wars, Wouk makes astute reference to the element that gives the novel its considerable power: he refers to his ``arduous per

Nov 29 1993 | Read Full Review of The Hope, A Novel

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