The House of Wittgenstein by Alexander Waugh
A Family at War

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Synopsis

The House of Wittgenstein is the grand saga of a brilliant and tragic Viennese family whose members included a famous philosopher and the world's greatest one-handed classical pianist.

The Wittgenstein family was one of the wealthiest, most talented, and most eccentric in European history, held together by a fanatical love of music yet torn apart by money, madness, conflicts of loyalty, and the upheaval of two world wars. Of the eight children, three committed suicide; Paul lost an arm in the war and yet stubbornly pursued a musical career; and Ludwig, the odd youngest son, is now regarded as one of the greatest philosophers of the twentieth century. Alexander Waugh, author of the acclaimed memoir Fathers and Sons and himself the offspring of a famous and eccentric family, tells their baroque tale with a novelistic richness to rival Thomas Mann’s Buddenbrooks.
 


From the Trade Paperback edition.
 

About Alexander Waugh

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ALEXANDER WAUGH is the grandson of Evelyn Waugh and the son of columnist Auberon Waugh. He has written several books, including Classical Music: A New Way of Listening, Time, and God. He lives in Somerset, England, with his wife and three children.From the Trade Paperback edition.
 
Published February 21, 2009 by Anchor. 352 pages
Genres: Biographies & Memoirs, History, Travel. Non-fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for The House of Wittgenstein

Kirkus Reviews

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Having dealt with four generations of his famous family in Fathers and Sons (2007, etc.), Waugh delves into another quirky, brilliant, ill-starred clan.

May 20 2010 | Read Full Review of The House of Wittgenstein: A ...

The New York Times

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Alexander Waugh tackles the notoriously eccentric Wittgensteins of Vienna in this family saga of suicide, depression, talent and wealth.

Apr 10 2009 | Read Full Review of The House of Wittgenstein: A ...

The New York Times

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Alexander Waugh tackles the notoriously eccentric Wittgensteins of Vienna in this family saga of suicide, depression, talent and wealth.

Apr 10 2009 | Read Full Review of The House of Wittgenstein: A ...

The New York Times

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A history of the morbid, musical, quarrelsome, brilliant Wittgensteins.

Mar 01 2009 | Read Full Review of The House of Wittgenstein: A ...

The New York Review of Books

I quite understand that reviewers cannot be expected to tailor all their work to the sensibilities of lunatics, but if there happen to be others among your readers who have also interpreted from Mr. Kirsch’s remarks that I am a “Jew-hating British intellectual piece of dog shit” I would advise th...

Jul 16 2009 | Read Full Review of The House of Wittgenstein: A ...

Time Out New York

Though a couple of the Wittgenstein sisters come off as relatively sensible, Waugh depicts virtuallay everyone as riddled with neuroses.

Feb 25 2009 | Read Full Review of The House of Wittgenstein: A ...

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