The House on Sugarbush Road by Meira Cook

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...until more novels do exactly that, the Rainbow Nation will remain No Country for Novelists. Sadly, The House on Sugarbush Road doesn’t do anything to alter that status quo.
-National Post arts

Synopsis

The House on Sugarbush Road, set in post-apartheid Johannesburg shortly after the 1994 election of Nelson Mandela, is the story of the intertwining lives of a once prominent liberal Afrikaner family and Beauty Mapule, their domestic servant of more than thirty years. Cook’s intimately interconnected and finely drawn characters are white, black, rich, poor, beautiful, ugly, old and young; they are also hustlers, do-gooders, petty criminals and sensualists, heading towards dramatic explosions both inevitable and unexpected.
 

About Meira Cook

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Born in Johannesburg, South Africa, Meira Cook immigrated to Canada in 1991 at the age of 26. An accomplished poet,"The Blood Girls" is her first novel. Meira Cook lived many years in Winnipeg, Manitoba, and has returned to Winnipeg after residing in British Columbia.
 
Published February 4, 2014 by Enfield & Wizenty. 312 pages
Genres: History, Literature & Fiction. Fiction
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Critic reviews for The House on Sugarbush Road
All: 2 | Positive: 0 | Negative: 2

National Post arts

Below average
Reviewed by Richard Poplak on Jan 18 2013

Nothing about Sugarbush Road feels telling or vital. By setting her tale at the dawn of democracy, Cook hits pause at a critical stage of South Africa’s history.

Read Full Review of The House on Sugarbush Road | See more reviews from National Post arts

National Post arts

Below average
Reviewed by Richard Poplak on Jan 18 2013

...until more novels do exactly that, the Rainbow Nation will remain No Country for Novelists. Sadly, The House on Sugarbush Road doesn’t do anything to alter that status quo.

Read Full Review of The House on Sugarbush Road | See more reviews from National Post arts

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