The Idea of Culture by Terry Eagleton
(Blackwell Manifestos)

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Synopsis

Terry Eagleton's book, in this vital new series from Blackwell, focuses on discriminating different meanings of culture, as a way of introducing to the general reader the contemporary debates around it.
 

About Terry Eagleton

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Terry Eagleton is Professor of Cultural Theory and John Rylands Fellow at the University of Manchester. His numerous works include The Illusions of Postmodernism (1996), Literary Theory: An Introduction (second edition , 1996), The Ideology of the Aesthetic (1990) and Scholars and Rebels in Nineteenth Century Ireland (1999), all published by Blackwell, as are his dramatic writings, St Oscar and Other Plays (1997), and the Eagleton Reader (1997) edited by Stephen Regan. Terry Eagleton is co-editor (with Stephen Regan) of The Blackwell Companion to Literary Theory, forthcoming in 2001.
 
Published May 29, 2013 by Wiley-Blackwell. 168 pages
Genres: Political & Social Sciences, Literature & Fiction, History. Non-fiction

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It is a little disconcerting, after reading the elegant and precise first chapter of Eagleton's overview of political, social and cultural concepts of culture, to find him stating at the outset of the

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With chapters on "The Value of Agony," "Pity, Fear and Pleasure" and "Freedom, Fate and Justice," British literary critic and political theorist Eagleton (whose well-received memoir The Gatekeeper is just out from St.Martin's) runs through the West's tragic literature, from Sophocles to Ibsen an...

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Yet in his later chapters--on the culture wars, the tension between nature and culture and the possibilities for creating a common culture--he breaks out of a purely descriptive mode and into a provocative, entertaining one, noting, for example, that Americans use the word ""America"" far more th...

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