The Illustrated Man by Ray Bradbury

83%

6 Critic Reviews

In addition, we find the wistful, nostalgic tone—a Bradbury trademark—and his preoccupation with children and the most child-like of technologies: namely spaceships, human-like robots...
-Blog Critics

Synopsis

You could hear the voices murmuring, small and muted, from the crowds that inhabited his body.

A peerless American storyteller, Ray Bradbury brings wonders alive. The Illustrated Man is classic Bradbury— eighteen startling visions of humankind’s destiny, unfolding across a canvas of decorated skin. In this phantasmagoric sideshow, living cities take their vengeance, technology awakens the most primal natural instincts, Martian invasions are foiled by the good life and the glad hand, and dreams are carried aloft in junkyard rockets. Provocative and powerful, Ray Bradbury’s The Illustrated Man is a kaleidoscopic blending of magic, imagination, and truth—as exhilarating as interplanetary travel, as maddening as a walk in a million-year rain, and as comforting as simple, familiar rituals on the last night of the world.

 

About Ray Bradbury

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In a career spanning more than seventy years, Ray Bradbury, who died on June 5, 2011 at the age of 91, inspired generations of readers to dream, think, and create. A prolific author of hundreds of short stories and close to fifty books, as well as numerous poems, essays, operas, plays, teleplays, and screenplays, Bradbury was one of the most celebrated writers of our time. His groundbreaking works include Fahrenheit 451, The Martian Chronicles, The Illustrated Man, Dandelion Wine, and Something Wicked This Way Comes. He wrote the screen play for John Huston's classic film adaptation of Moby Dick, and was nominated for an Academy Award. He adapted sixty-five of his stories for television's The Ray Bradbury Theater, and won an Emmy for his teleplay of The Halloween Tree. He was the recipient of the 2000 National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters, the 2004 National Medal of Arts, and the 2007 Pulitzer Prize Special Citation, among many honors.Throughout his life, Bradbury liked to recount the story of meeting a carnival magician, Mr. Electrico, in 1932. At the end of his performance Electrico reached out to the twelve-year-old Bradbury, touched the boy with his sword, and commanded, "Live forever!" Bradbury later said, "I decided that was the greatest idea I had ever heard. I started writing every day. I never stopped."
 
Published April 30, 2013 by William Morrow Paperbacks. 291 pages
Genres: Science Fiction & Fantasy, Horror, Literature & Fiction, Education & Reference, Science & Math. Fiction
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Critic reviews for The Illustrated Man
All: 6 | Positive: 6 | Negative: 0

Kirkus

Good
Reviewed by Kirkus Reviews on Mar 20 2012

Here is an open circuit on ideas, which range from religion, to racial questions, to the atom bomb, rocket travel (of course), literature, escape to the past, dreams...

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Blog Critics

Good
Reviewed by Ted Gioia on Feb 17 2009

In addition, we find the wistful, nostalgic tone—a Bradbury trademark—and his preoccupation with children and the most child-like of technologies: namely spaceships, human-like robots...

Read Full Review of The Illustrated Man | See more reviews from Blog Critics

Christian Science Monitor

Good
Reviewed by Husna Haq on Jun 06 2012

In this book of 18 science fiction short stories published in 1951, Bradbury explores the nature of mankind.

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SF Site

Good
Reviewed by Ivy Reisner on Jan 09 2011

These stories move easily between the warm, sweet bedtime story, to the haunting tales that will live with you forever.

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SF Site

Excellent
Reviewed by Tim Krauskopf on Jan 09 2008

Bradbury is the master of the short story and you won't be disappointed by any of these 18 gems.

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Helium

Good
Reviewed by Elton Gahr on Aug 24 2009

Every story in this anthology is worth reading alone and together they make an odd narrative about the human condition that adds to each of them and takes you on a journey you didn't even know you were taking until it's over.

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Ticiano Oliveira

Ticiano Oliveira 5 Sep 2013

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