The Inferno by Dante, Robert Hollander & Jean Hollander
(English and Italian Edition)

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Synopsis

The epic grandeur of Dante’s masterpiece has inspired readers for 700 years, and has entered the human imagination. But the further we move from the late medieval world of Dante, the more a rich understanding and enjoyment of the poem depends on knowledgeable guidance. Robert Hollander, a renowned scholar and master teacher of Dante, and Jean Hollander, an accomplished poet, have written a beautifully accurate and clear verse translation of the first volume of Dante’s epic poem, the Divine Comedy. Featuring the original Italian text opposite the translation, this edition also offers an extensive and accessible introduction and generous commentaries that draw on centuries of scholarship as well as Robert Hollander’s own decades of teaching and research. The Hollander translation is the new standard in English of this essential work of world literature.
 

About Dante, Robert Hollander & Jean Hollander

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Jean Hollander is a poet, teacher, and director of the Writers' Conference at the College of New Jersey. Robert Hollander, her husband, has been teaching Dante's Divine Comedy to Princeton students for forty years, and is the author of a dozen books and more than seventy articles on Dante, Boccaccio, and other Italian authors. He has received many awards, including the gold medal of the city of Florence, in recognition of his work on Dante. They are at work on their translation of Paradiso, the conclusion of the Divine Comedy.
 
Published July 11, 2012 by Anchor. 736 pages
Genres: Literature & Fiction. Non-fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for The Inferno

Publishers Weekly

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The opening canzone of Dante Alighieri's The Divine Comedy has appeared in almost every imaginable variety of English translation: prose, blank verse and iambic pentameter; unrhymed or in terza rima;

Dec 04 2000 | Read Full Review of The Inferno (English and Ital...

The Guardian

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The Divine Comedy I: Inferno, by Dante Alighieri, translated and edited by Robin Kirkpatrick (Penguin, £9.99) In 1966, the critic Frances Ferguson wrote: "About 16 years ago the late Erich Auerbach told me that the current output of writing on Dante in all languages had reached such a point that ...

Mar 25 2006 | Read Full Review of The Inferno (English and Ital...

The Guardian

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The Inferno of Dante Alighieri, translated by Ciaran Carson (Granta, £7.99) Samuel Beckett, whom we would do well to emulate, was once asked what ambitions he had.

Nov 13 2004 | Read Full Review of The Inferno (English and Ital...

Publishers Weekly

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In the high-stakes field of translating the great 14th-century Italian poet Dante, for years the stellar prose efforts of John Sinclair (Oxford) and Charles Singleton (Princeton) ruled because they focused on meaning rather than poetic effect.

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Publishers Weekly

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While Mandelbaum's translation begins ""When I had journeyed half of our life's way,/ I found myself within a shadowed forest,/ for I had lost the path that does not stray,"" the Hollanders' rendition reads: ""Midway in the journey of our life/ I came to myself in a dark wood,/ for the straight w...

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Publishers Weekly

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Though transforming Dante's terza rima into readable English has bogged down many a distinguished translator, Pinsky (The Want Bone) more than meets the challenge.

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Examiner

EA and Visceral Games have carefully adapted Alighieri's epic poem into an interactive video game for a new generation to enjoy.

Feb 16 2010 | Read Full Review of The Inferno (English and Ital...

New York Journal of Books

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It is fiendishly funny.In this new translation, the dark humor of the original is allowed full rein.Mary Jo Bang, herself an accomplished poet, brings her own peculiar voice to the translation, which is only right.

Aug 07 2012 | Read Full Review of The Inferno (English and Ital...

Portland Book Review

Although the work unquestionably remains Dante Alighieri’s classic journey through Hell, the translator’s use of modern slang and references to pop culture makes this version of the Inferno a one-of-a-kind reading experience.

Aug 20 2012 | Read Full Review of The Inferno (English and Ital...

London Review of Books

Dante never ends a sentence anywhere other than at the end of a line, but there is a comparable movement in the Italian at this point, which Carson elaborates into the shift from that purse-lipped, kid-gloved word, ‘illicitly’, over the hesitation to the intimate thought and rhythmical flurry: ‘J...

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The New York Review of Books

This startling new translation of Dante’s Inferno is by Ciaran Carson, one of contemporary Ireland’s most dazzlingly gifted poets.

Oct 31 2004 | Read Full Review of The Inferno (English and Ital...

The American Conservative

Also, though this is not a “Christian” book per se, the theme of faith as a source of strength through dark times runs strong in the book.

Dec 10 2014 | Read Full Review of The Inferno (English and Ital...

The Paris Review

It’s also difficult to tell whether Dante is nerding out and imagining what it would be like to hang out with his heroes, or if he’s pulling some sort of lyrical power move and trying to assert himself as one of the greatest poets of history (again, only time will tell).

Oct 28 2013 | Read Full Review of The Inferno (English and Ital...

The Paris Review

Blog Home .

Feb 03 2014 | Read Full Review of The Inferno (English and Ital...

The Paris Review

The Flaying of Marsyas has “something to do with human life and all its ambiguities and all its horrors and terrors and misery,” she told the BBC, “and at the same time there’s something beautiful, the picture is beautiful, and something also to do with the entry of the spiritual into the human s...

Jul 15 2015 | Read Full Review of The Inferno (English and Ital...

The Paris Review

But here, Virgil doesn’t seem to take pleasure in watching Dante rip a branch from the tree, nor does he castigate him for pitying Pier.

Jan 13 2014 | Read Full Review of The Inferno (English and Ital...

The Paris Review

Although Auerbach really reveals the structure and the facts of this work, now I’m paying more attention to the really small details, for instance: the moment Dante faints or the moment he leaps in the boat, as the recap says, are pure Dante.

Oct 21 2013 | Read Full Review of The Inferno (English and Ital...

The Paris Review

Upon reading the notes in the back of the book, a reader can discover that this area of hell is reserved for those who committed barratry, which, according to the American Heritage Dictionary, is “sale or purchase of positions in the state.” Because this sin is so similar to simony, which was pun...

Mar 24 2014 | Read Full Review of The Inferno (English and Ital...

The Paris Review

Here, in canto 34, the final chapter, Dante and Virgil meet Lucifer and climb up his back in order to slip through a crack in the universe and leave the Inferno.

Jun 30 2014 | Read Full Review of The Inferno (English and Ital...

The Paris Review

It is probably true that there won’t be a Dante line of clothing at Banana Republic, and there certainly won’t be a fleet of Dante cosplayers at next year’s Comic Con.

Jun 02 2014 | Read Full Review of The Inferno (English and Ital...

The Paris Review

Virgil, ever quick with the quips, suggests that Dante doesn’t really care all that much about his cousin—instead of talking to him when he had the chance, Dante instead decided to chat with Bertran de Born.

Jun 30 2014 | Read Full Review of The Inferno (English and Ital...

The Paris Review

Upon reading the notes in the back of the book, a reader can discover that this area of hell is reserved for those who committed barratry, which, according to the American Heritage Dictionary, is “sale or purchase of positions in the state.” Because this sin is so similar to simony, which was pun...

Mar 24 2014 | Read Full Review of The Inferno (English and Ital...

The Paris Review

Cavafy, Canto XXVI, Dante, Ithaca, Odysseus, The Divine Comedy, The Inferno, Ulysses.

Apr 21 2014 | Read Full Review of The Inferno (English and Ital...

The Paris Review

Upon reading the notes in the back of the book, a reader can discover that this area of hell is reserved for those who committed barratry, which, according to the American Heritage Dictionary, is “sale or purchase of positions in the state.” Because this sin is so similar to simony, which was pun...

Apr 30 2014 | Read Full Review of The Inferno (English and Ital...

The Paris Review

Thus, Dante has written a Virgil who speaks Italian, but whom Dante may have had some difficulty communicating with, because they spoke different dialects.

Mar 24 2014 | Read Full Review of The Inferno (English and Ital...

The Paris Review

The simple fact that Dante can invoke Virgil so effortlessly not only points to a certain aptitude for getting into Virgil’s bones, but even suggests that Dante knows Virgil’s poetry better than Virgil probably knew it himself.

Feb 11 2014 | Read Full Review of The Inferno (English and Ital...

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