The Khan's Daughter by Lawrence Yep
A Mongolian Folktale

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Synopsis

A poor but ambitious shepherd tries to win the hand of the Khan's independent daughter in this lavishly illustrated folktale from an award-winning writer and illustrator team.

In ancient Mongolia, Mongke, a poor shepherd, heard a prophecy: he would become a rich man and marry the khan's daughter. Mongke goes to the court but the khan laughs at him. However, if he can perform three tasks, he may marry the princess. Through luck and chance, he completes the first two tasks, but then the khan's daughter sets the third. He must defeat the bandit Bagatur. Mongke is defeated. Disgraced he returns to the court only to learn that Bagatur is really the princess. Now that he has learned humility, the princess agrees to marry him. They rule in equally and in harmony.
 

About Lawrence Yep

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Laurence Yep, born in 1948 in San Francisco, is a well-known writer of fiction for young adults. He has also written and edited several works for adults. Yep was educated at Marquette University and holds a Ph.D. from the State University of New York at Buffalo. Yep is Chinese American. He grew up in a black neighborhood in San Francisco, attended school in Chinatown, and later attended a predominately white high school. Much of the subject matter for his work comes out of his experiences trying to establish his own identity as a child and teenager. He writes about the experience of the "outsider" or "alien" and perhaps that is why his first writing was science fiction. Sweetwater, his first novel, was published in 1973 and is a work of science fiction. His second work Dragonwings published in 1975 is widely acclaimed. This is a work of historical fiction that deals with the Chinese American experience of the 1930's when many immigrants came to this country. Yep has gone on to write many other stories about Chinese Americans. He has also written mysteries, two of which have as the main character Mark Twain as a reporter in San Francisco. Yep has written fantasy works such as Shadow Lord and Kind Hearts and Gentle Monsters. Yep has won numerous awards for his work included a Book-of-the-Month-Club Writing Fellowship in 1970, the prestigious Newbery Medal Honor Book, and the Boston Globe-Horn Book Award several times. Tseng is an illustrator who was born and raised in Taiwan. He is the only artist living outside China to have received the Golden Globet Award for excellence in Chinese painting from the National Art Association in Taiwan. Tseng has illustrated severl books that have received high priase.
 
Published June 1, 2002 by Scholastic Paperbacks. 32 pages
Genres: Education & Reference, Children's Books, Literature & Fiction. Non-fiction

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Kirkus Reviews

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Yep (The Boy Who Swallowed Snakes, 1994, etc.) extends his series of picture-book retellings of Asian folktales with this Mongolian story of a poor young shepherd who wins the hand of the Khan's daughter through dumb luck and the smitten maiden's collusion.

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Publishers Weekly

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in the peasant's first glimpse, the city of domed tents resembles ""so many buttons sewn onto a giant sheet of brown felt."" While the casual tone updates an old tale, the animated watercolors of the Tsengs, who have collaborated with Yep before (The Ghost Fox;

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Publishers Weekly

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PW said that this story about a cocky peasant who sets out to win the hand of the Khan's daughter "embraces human foibles with both the ageless charm of a traditional tale and the informal breeziness of a modern sensibility."

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