The Kitchen God's Wife by Amy Tan

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Synopsis

With the same narrative skills and evocative powers that made her first novel, The Joy Luck Club, a national bestseller, Tan now tells the story of Winnie Louie, an aging Chinese woman unfolding a life's worth of secrets to her suspicious, Americanized daughter.
 

About Amy Tan

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Amy Tan is the author of The Joy Luck Club, The Kitchen God's Wife, The Hundred Secret Senses, The Bonesetter's Daughter, The Opposite of Fate: Memories of a Writing Life, Saving Fish from Drowning, and two children's books, The Moon Lady and Sagwa, which has now been adapted as a PBS production. Tan was also a co-producer and co-screenwriter of the film version of The Joy Luck Club. Her essays and stories have appeared in numerous magazines and anthologies. Her work has been translated into thirty-five languages. She lives with her husband in San Francisco and New York.
 
Published January 1, 1991 by Fontana. 415 pages
Genres: Literature & Fiction, Education & Reference, Mystery, Thriller & Suspense, History. Fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for The Kitchen God's Wife

Kirkus Reviews

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So Winnie sits down and tells Pearl the story of her life before coming to America and before her marriage to the man Pearl thinks is her father--a life of hell spent with a deeply disturbed, sadistic first husband, Pearl's real father.

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Publishers Weekly

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Tan's ( The Joy Luck Club ) mesmerizing second novel, again a story that a Chinese emigre mother tells her daughter, received a PW boxed review, spent 18 weeks on PW 's hardcover bestseller list and was a Literary Guild and Doubleday Book Club main selection in cloth.

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Publishers Weekly

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Tan's immensely perceptive and poignant second novel tells of an aging Chinese woman's relationship with her American daughter.

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Publishers Weekly

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As Winnie gains insights into the motivations for other peoples' actions, she herself grows strong enough to conceal her past while building a new life in America, never admitting her deadly hidden fears.

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Examiner

Amy Tan, who wrote “The Joy Luck Club”, has once again reached into the hearts and minds of mothers and daughters everywhere and put their feelings on paper in her 1991 novel, “The Kitchen God’s Wife”.

Jul 15 2010 | Read Full Review of The Kitchen God's Wife

Entertainment Weekly

As the ill-starred weekend ends, Pearl receives Great-Auntie Du's legacy: a strikingly ugly altar for the officious, capricious kitchen god, who seems to have hired Pearl's mother and the rest of the family as part-time help.

Jun 21 1991 | Read Full Review of The Kitchen God's Wife

USA Today

Youth: Amid unrest in dystopian Chicago, Tris harbors a secret that may help save those she loves.

Jan 10 2014 | Read Full Review of The Kitchen God's Wife

People

But a relative's death brings the extended family together and lets Winnie recall secrets she has kept hidden since her youth in China, secrets that inevitably bind her closer to headstrong daughter Pearl.

Jul 22 1991 | Read Full Review of The Kitchen God's Wife

London Review of Books

She wrote about what she had seen herself and what she hadn’t – her own experience and her mother’s She produced a long, complex and seductive narrative, The Joy Luck Club, which was one of the best sellers of 1989.

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Reader Rating for The Kitchen God's Wife
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