The Labor Movement by Tim McNeese
Unionizing America (Reform Movements in American History)

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Synopsis

The labor movement espoused social equality and honest labor through the formation of labor unions. Although groups such as the Knights of Labor and the American Federation of Labor, both of which represented skilled laborers, began to figure prominently in industry in the late 1800s, labor unions that represented unskilled workers did not gain influence until the early 1900s. By the 1930s, labor unions were becoming more accepted, thanks in part to the National Labor Relations Act, which gave workers the right to establish unions without interference from their employers. Crisply written and illustrated with compelling photographs and sidebars, "The Labor Movement" is a thorough look at the movement that has had a profound effect on how industry operates in the United States.
 

About Tim McNeese

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Series editor Tim McNeese is associate professor of history at York College in York, Nebraska. He earned an associate's degree from York College, a B.A. in history and political science from Harding University, and an M.A. in history from Missouri State University. He has published more than 100 books and educational materials in the past 20 years, on everything from the founding of Jamestown to the lives of Spanish painters. His writing has earned him a citation in the library reference work Contemporary Authors. In 2006, McNeese appeared on the History Channel program Risk Takers/History Makers: John Wesley Powell and the Grand Canyon.
 
Published October 1, 2007 by Chelsea House Pub (L). 160 pages
Genres: History, Education & Reference, Young Adult. Non-fiction

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