The Last Madam by Christine Wiltz
A Life in the New Orleans Underworld

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Synopsis

1916: Norma Wallace, age 15, arrived in New Orleans. Sexy and shrewd, she quickly went from streetwalker to madam and by 1920 had opened what became a legendary house of prostitution. There she entertained a steady stream of governors, gangsters, and movie stars until she was arrested at last in 1962. Shortly before she died in 1974, she tape-recorded her memories - the scandalous stories of a powerful woman with the city's politicians in her pocket and whose lovers included the 25 year old boy-next-door, whom she married at age 64. With those tapes and original research, Christine Wiltz chronicles Norma's rise and fall with the social history of New Orleans. Thick with the vice and corruption that flourished there, Wiltz resurrects a vanished secret world.
 

About Christine Wiltz

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Christine Wiltz is the author of four novels. She lives in her native New Orleans.
 
Published July 1, 2014 by Open Road Media. 268 pages
Genres: Biographies & Memoirs, History, Crime. Non-fiction

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Wiltz also roams beyond Wallace’s professional and romantic affairs to spotlight her state’s infamously crooked politics, the licensed depravities of the French Quarter, and Wallace’s humorous attempt to realize a pastoral ideal in the backwoods amid a community of righteous citizens.

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Encouraged by Jean Bernard, the wife of Wallace’s fifth and final husband, Wayne Bernard, who was thirty-nine years younger than Wallace, Wiltz wrote the story of the life and legacy of Norma Wallace.

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