The Leopard Woman by Stewart Edward White

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Excerpt: ... had some errand with M'tela, like his own, she would not want to turn back, but she would like a plausible excuse to separate from him once the ranges of mountains were crossed. Why did she not drop off then on the excuse, say, of the wonderful new hunting grounds? That would be simple. Kingozi concluded that she wished the initiative to come from him. And the more convinced he was that she wanted to get rid of him, the more firmly he resolved that she must remain. But it did make for slow travel. What of it? There was no haste. There was plenty of game, the days passed pleasantly, the evenings were delightful. A moonbeam flashed in his brain showing him vistas--He firmly shut the window! Certainly if Bibi-ya-chui harboured any active desire to drive Kingozi into leaving her to her own devices, she concealed it well. Occasionally in the evening, when he stared into the distance, she twisted herself to look at him. Then her eyes widened, no one could have told with what emotion. In her fixed stare could have been many things-or nothing. Did she desire this man, as she had seemed to the night of the full moon, and did she but bide her time, knowing this was not the moment? Did she desire this man, and hate him because he had touched her only to turn away? Did the very simplicity and directness of his nature baffle her? Did she hate him for his mastering of circumstances but not herself? Any or all of these emotions might have lain beneath the smoulder in her eyes. One thing Kingozi would not have seen, had he turned his head suddenly enough, and that was indifference. But he continued to stare out into the veldt, and she continued to stare at him; while around them the chatter of men, the wail of hyenas, the thunder of lions, the shrill, thin cries of night birds, and the mighty brooding silence that took no account of them all attended the African night. CHAPTER XV THE SHARPENING OF THE SPEAR Thus passed six weeks. By the end of this time the...

About Stewart Edward White

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Author Stewart Edward White was born in Grand Rapids, Michigan on March 12, 1873. He received a degree in Philosophy from the University of Michigan in 1895 and a M. A. from Columbia University in 1903. He wrote numerous books, articles, and short stories about his experiences in mining and lumber camps and on exploration trips. Some of his best known novels include The Claim Jumpers, The Blazed Trail, Gold, The Gray Dawn, and The Rose Dawn. He died in San Francisco, California on September 18, 1946.
Published March 24, 2011 by Doubleday Page. 238 pages
Genres: Literature & Fiction, Children's Books, Education & Reference, History, Computers & Technology, Action & Adventure, Mystery, Thriller & Suspense, Romance. Fiction

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