The Letters of Allen Ginsberg by BILL MORGAN

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Synopsis

Allen Ginsberg (1926-1997) was one of twentieth-century literature-s most prolific letter-writers. This definitive volume showcases his correspondence with some of the most original and interesting artists of his time, including Jack Kerouac, William S. Burroughs, Gregory Corso, Neal Cassady, Lionel Trilling, Charles Olson, Lawrence Ferlinghetti, Philip Whalen, Peter Orlovsky, Philip Glass, Arthur Miller, Ken Kesey, and hundreds of others. Through his letter writing, Ginsberg coordinated the efforts of his literary circle and kept everyone informed about what everyone else was doing. He also preached the gospel of the Beat movement by addressing political and social issues in countless letters to publishers, editors, and the news media, devising an entirely new way to educate readers and disseminate information. Drawing from numerous sources, this collection is both a riveting life in letters and an intimate guide to understanding an entire creative generation.
 

About BILL MORGAN

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Allen Ginsberg was born June 3, 1926, the son of Naomi Ginsberg, Russian émigré, and Louis Ginsberg, lyric poet and school teacher, in Paterson, N.J. To these facts Ginsberg adds: "High school in Paterson till 17, Columbia College, merchant marine, Texas and Denver copyboy, Times Square, amigos in jail, dishwashing, book reviews, Mexico City, market research, Satori in Harlem, Yucatan and Chiapas 1954, West Coast 3 years. Later Arctic Sea trip, Tangier, Venice, Amsterdam, Paris, read at Oxford Harvard Columbia Chicago, quit, wrote "Kaddish" 1959, made tape to leave behind & fade in Orient awhile. Carl Solomon to whom "Howl" is addressed, is a intuitive Bronx dadaist and prose-poet."
 
Published September 1, 2008 by Da Capo. 501 pages
Genres: Biographies & Memoirs, Literature & Fiction. Non-fiction

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The New York Times

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seaman who confessed that PM.” Al Sublette, who features in Kerouac’s novel “Big Sur” under the name Mal Damlette, was also in prison — “I heard for a burglary.” All the news from out West, much of it conveyed by Cassady’s “haggard” wife Carolyn, with whom Ginsberg had been on unfriendly terms si...

Jan 09 2009 | Read Full Review of The Letters of Allen Ginsberg

The New York Times

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I still think you would find it a restful and creative thing to do this year — come over here and join us farming and fishing — no newspapermen, no literature.” As the Cherry Valley experiment sank under the weight of indiscipline — “The farm never became the escape from addictions that Ginsberg...

Jan 09 2009 | Read Full Review of The Letters of Allen Ginsberg

Publishers Weekly

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This epistolary novel, first published in 1963, is actually a fascinating travel log written mostly by Burroughs of a trip he made to Peru and Colombia in 1953 to track down the legendary yage vine (also called ayahuasca ), valued among the Indians for its telepathic and anesthetic powers.

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Publishers Weekly

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At times loving, at others blistering, sarcastic, often uncomfortably self-lacerating and intimate, these 200 letters, collected in a heroic editorial effort by Ginsberg biographer Morgan and independent editor Stanford, cover the years 1944–1963, the most fertile in the creative lives of Kerou...

May 17 2010 | Read Full Review of The Letters of Allen Ginsberg

Publishers Weekly

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In 1962 Allen Ginsberg wrote to Bertrand Russell: “All I know is, I've lived in the midst of apparent worldly events and apparent transcendental insights, and it all adds up to I don't know what.” Both the worldliness and the transcendence come through in these letters by the beat poet, published...

Jun 30 2008 | Read Full Review of The Letters of Allen Ginsberg

BC Books

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Ginsberg archivist Bill Morgan has culled the best of over 3,700 letters Ginsberg penned down to the 165 included in The Letters of Allen Ginsberg.

Dec 31 2008 | Read Full Review of The Letters of Allen Ginsberg

San Francisco Chronicle

Allen Ginsberg was a hawk.

Sep 20 2008 | Read Full Review of The Letters of Allen Ginsberg

Project MUSE

As in such volumes as One Art: Letters by Elizabeth Bishop (Robert Giroux, 1995) and Emily Dickinson: Selected Letters (Thomas Herbert Johnson, 1994), The Letters of Allen Ginsberg represents a peculiar symbiosis between editor and author.

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