The Letters of T.S. Eliot by T. S. Eliot
Volume 1: 1898-1922, Revised Edition

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Synopsis

Volume One: 1898–1922 presents some 1,400 letters encompassing the years of Eliot's childhood in St. Louis, Missouri, through 1922, by which time the poet had settled in England, married his first wife, and published The Waste Land. Since the first publication of this volume in 1988, many new materials from British and American sources have come to light. More than two hundred of these newly discovered letters are now included, filling crucial gaps in the record and shedding new light on Eliot's activities in London during and after the First World War.

Volume Two: 1923–1925 covers the early years of Eliot's editorship of The Criterion, publication of The Hollow Men, and his developing thought about poetry and poetics. The volume offers 1,400 letters, charting Eliot's journey toward conversion to the Anglican faith, as well as his transformation from banker to publisher and his appointment as director of the new publishing house Faber & Gwyer. The prolific and various correspondence of this volume testifies to Eliot's growing influence as cultural commentator and editor.

 

About T. S. Eliot

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Thomas Stearns Eliot was born in 1888 in St. Louis, Missouri, and became a British subject in 1927. The acclaimed poet of The Waste Land, Four Quartets, and Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats, among numerous other poems, prose, and works of drama, won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1948. T.S. Eliot died in 1965 in London, England, and is buried in Westminster Abbey.
 
Published September 20, 2011 by Yale University Press. 912 pages
Genres: Literature & Fiction, Religion & Spirituality. Non-fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for The Letters of T.S. Eliot

The New York Times

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Eliot had a masochistic capacity for work — the magazine was “run without an office,” he wrote, “without any staff or business manager, by a sickly bank clerk and his wife.” It was also run without a salary, in the short hours after Eliot returned home each evening from Lloyds.

Sep 30 2011 | Read Full Review of The Letters of T.S. Eliot: Vo...

The Guardian

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In addition, Eliot came in for some rough handling in the wake of Anthony Julius's 1995 book, TS Eliot: Anti-Semitism and Literary Form, which mounted, with great forensic vigour, the case that Eliot's oeuvre as a whole was irremediably tainted on account of a handful of allegedly antisemitic ref...

Nov 07 2009 | Read Full Review of The Letters of T.S. Eliot: Vo...

The Wall Street Journal

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Shifting between horror and hilarity, the early letters of T.S.

Sep 17 2011 | Read Full Review of The Letters of T.S. Eliot: Vo...

The Independent

Faber £40 Yours faithfully, kindly and with modesty, Tom The first two volumes of T S Eliot's letters, covering the years from 1898 to 1925, revealed an emerging poet and a disastrous marriage.

Jun 24 2012 | Read Full Review of The Letters of T.S. Eliot: Vo...

The Independent

The fourth volume of T S Eliot's correspondence reveals an influential and newly self-confident figure, with deepened religious conviction The passage from private to public that dominated the third volume of T S Eliot's letters, covering the period from 1926 to 1927, seems almost complete in t...

Jan 13 2013 | Read Full Review of The Letters of T.S. Eliot: Vo...

The Telegraph

“We owe the poem to her, no question: he wouldn’t have written it if she hadn’t given him such hell.” And in oblique confirmation of this claim, in a letter included here, discussing The Waste Land with E M Forster on August 10 1929, Eliot says: “You exaggerate the importance of the W...

Jan 17 2013 | Read Full Review of The Letters of T.S. Eliot: Vo...

The Telegraph

There is also a quite engaging letter written by Eliot to his solicitors, in which he instructs them: 'Brevity is desirable!’.) There are dutiful letters home: 'The work at the Bank is interesting, as interesting as bank work can be.’ To which mother responds: 'It must be a great sour...

Dec 13 2009 | Read Full Review of The Letters of T.S. Eliot: Vo...

The Telegraph

"Practically, one crucifies oneself and entertains drawing rooms and lounges.” This sentence by T S Eliot on the reception of his extraordinary, agonised poem, The Waste Land (1922), is a thrilling moment in the long-awaited second volume of his letters.

Nov 06 2009 | Read Full Review of The Letters of T.S. Eliot: Vo...

London Review of Books

The new edition adds 195 more letters by Eliot, another 27 by Vivien and 33 others.

Dec 03 2009 | Read Full Review of The Letters of T.S. Eliot: Vo...

London Review of Books

In leaving the bank I hope to become less a machine – but yet I am frightened – because I don’t know what it will do to me – and to V – should I come alive again.

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New Statesman

We see Eliot so­liciting contributions and rejecting them, some­times with encouragement, as in a 1927 note to W H Auden: “I do not feel that any of the enclosed is quite right, but I should be interested to follow your work.” (In one of countless examples of editorial diligence, a footnote quote...

Jun 13 2012 | Read Full Review of The Letters of T.S. Eliot: Vo...

Literary Review

The big names - Wyndham Lewis, Ezra Pound, Virginia Woolf and W B Yeats - are well represented, along with an illustrious cast of literary worthies from Auden (his first appearance in the letters being a courteous rejection note) to Gertrude Stein (another rejection, rather less courteous), Rober...

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Islington Tribute

BOTH of these monumental volumes of The Letters of TS Eliot of 871 and 877 pages respectively make crystal clear TS Eliot’s intense need of the extended family he found at Faber & Faber, the publisher.

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