The Line of Beauty by Alan Hollinghurst

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Synopsis

"One can't get enough of Hollinghurst's sentences...If you value style, wit, and social satire in your reading, don't miss this elegant and passionate novel."—Washington Post
Winner of 2004's Man Booker Prize for fiction and one of the most talked about books of the year, The Line of Beauty is a sweeping novel about class, sex, and money that brings Thatcher's London alive. Nick Guest has moved in with the Feddens, a family whose patriarch is a conservative member of parliament. An innocent in matters of politics and money, Nick becomes caught up in the Feddens' world of parties and excess, as well as in his own private pursuit of beauty. Framed by the two general elections that returned Margaret Thatcher to power, The Line of Beauty unfurls through four extraordinary years of change and tragedy.
A New York Times Bestseller (Extended) • A LA Times Bestseller List • A Book Sense National Bestseller • A Northern California Bestseller • A Sunday Times Bestseller List • A New York Times Notable Book of the Year
And chosen as one of the best books of 2004 by: Entertainment Weekly The Washington Post The San Francisco Chronicle The Seattle Times Newsday • Salon.com • The Boston Globe The New York Sun The Miami Herald The Dallas Morning News San Jose Mercury News Publishers Weekly
"A magnificent comedy of manners. Hollinghurst's alertness to the tiniest social and tonal shifts never slackens, and positively luxuriates in a number of unimprovably droll set pieces...[an] outstanding novel."—New York Times Book Review
"Hollinghurst has placed his gay protagonist within a larger social context, and the result is his most tender and powerful novel to date, a sprawling and haunting elegy to the 1980s. A"—Entertainment Weekly
"Mr. Hollinghurst's great gift as a novelist is for social satire as sharp and tra
 

About Alan Hollinghurst

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Alan Hollinghurst is the author of the novels The Swimming-Pool Library, The Folding Star, The Spell and The Line of Beauty, which won the Man Booker Prize and was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award. He has received the Somerset Maugham Award, the E. M. Forster Award of the American Academy of Arts and Letters and the James Tait Black Memorial Prize for Fiction. He lives in London.
 
Published December 17, 2008 by Bloomsbury USA. 524 pages
Genres: Gay & Lesbian, Literature & Fiction, History, Arts & Photography. Fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for The Line of Beauty

Kirkus Reviews

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Britisher Hollinghurst (The Spell, 1998, etc.) isn't shy: At 400-plus pages sprinkled with references to Henry James, his fourth outing aspires to the status of an epic about sex, politics, money, and high society.

May 20 2010 | Read Full Review of The Line of Beauty

The New York Times

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Nick is distractedly writing a thesis on Henry James and later tries to stir interest in a film adaptation of ''The Spoils of Poynton.'' When a dinner guest asks him, ''What would Henry James have made of us, I wonder?,'' Nick replies: ''He'd have been very kind to us, he'd have said how wonderfu...

Oct 31 2004 | Read Full Review of The Line of Beauty

The New York Times

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Nick is distractedly writing a thesis on Henry James and later tries to stir interest in a film adaptation of ''The Spoils of Poynton.'' When a dinner guest asks him, ''What would Henry James have made of us, I wonder?,'' Nick replies: ''He'd have been very kind to us, he'd have said how wonderfu...

Oct 31 2004 | Read Full Review of The Line of Beauty

The Guardian

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1986 Nick and Wani snorted cocaine, and then Nick watched as Wani was sodomised by a rent boy.

Oct 25 2004 | Read Full Review of The Line of Beauty

The Guardian

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The Line of Beauty by Alan Hollinghurst 501pp, Picador, £16.99 A few pages into Alan Hollinghurst's novel, something remarkable happens.

Apr 10 2004 | Read Full Review of The Line of Beauty

Publishers Weekly

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The first section shows Nick moving into the Notting Hill mansion of Gerald Fedden, one of Thatcher's Tory MPs, at the request of the minister's son, Toby, Nick's all-too-straight Oxford crush.

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BC Books

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It can be no coincidence that Nick, the Oxford graduate who comes to stay, has the surname Guest.

May 03 2009 | Read Full Review of The Line of Beauty

Entertainment Weekly

Consider the last time Nick sees a shockingly wasted Leo: at a distance, in a bar, a ''little woolly-hatted figure...who had once been his lover.'' Nick doesn't approach him;

Oct 22 2004 | Read Full Review of The Line of Beauty

https://bookpage.com

Nick is not unlike Isabel Archer, the heroine of that James novel, in that circumstances ultimately put him in the position of victim, but Nick whose sexual preference has made him vulnerable, a situation which could easily have been caused by race, gender or class in another time never takes tha...

Apr 22 2016 | Read Full Review of The Line of Beauty

Bookmarks Magazine

In fact, Hollinghurst "gets Nick and his decade so right that you can’t help wondering what sort of vision [he] may deliver of our own far-too-interesting times" (Seattle Times).

Oct 10 2007 | Read Full Review of The Line of Beauty

New York Magazine

Alan Hollinghurst’s fourth novel—just awarded England’s Man Booker Prize—is a scathing examination of the sexual, racial, and class fault lines of the Thatcher era as they converge in one young man’s life.

May 21 2005 | Read Full Review of The Line of Beauty

Reader Rating for The Line of Beauty
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